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. Beyond Ambivalence. Postmodernity and the Ethics of Translation. Koskinen, K. 2000b. Institutional Illusions. Translating in the EU Commission. The Translator Vol. 6. No. 1. 49

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Connor, U., Helle, T., Mauranen, A., Ringbom, H., Tirkkonen-Condit, S. & Yli-Antola, M. 1995. Tehokkaita EU-projektiehdotuksia. Englannin kielen käyttöä koskevia ohjeita (A guide for writing effective EU

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This paper outlines the roles of the translator, the terminologist and the reviser described by their input and output information in the translation workflow. A real application of the computational work-flow management of translation in the project Translation of EU Legislation Texts into Hungarian is shown. With the help of the computational translation tools developed for this project, 40,000 pages of translation by around 100 translators was done by a Consortium consisting of three translation agencies, a revision agency and a language technology partner. A very important by-product, a common English-Hungarian glossary of 11,000 legal terms introduced by the translators involved in the project was also produced.

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Summary

Terminology validation network VALITER. The European Union, as a community of law, produces a considerable amount of legislation. Given the primacy of EU law and its precedence over national law, the accuracy of terminology is the cornerstone for equivalent legal certainty in all language versions. Cooperation between the institutional translators of the EU and national specialists is essential to develop and consolidate a high quality level of terminology. We present in this paper the terminology validation network VALITER, developed by D.1 Unit (Field Offices and Relations with the Representations) and the Spanish Department of the Directorate General for Translation of the European Commission, in cooperation with AETER (Spanish Association for Terminology) and with the active involvement of various committees and expert groups.

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Translation activities have long been on the rise since Turkey committed itself to join the European Union. The majority of the translation activities fall into the category of technical translation in Turkey, which is an indicator of the significance of terminology. Problems encountered in translating technical texts can be solved with the help of terminology databases. Unfortunately, the importance of such databases has not been recognized in Turkey yet. Furthermore, the lack of consistency in terms used in translations stands out as a problem. The lack of established terminology networks for specific fields is also a major problem for the public organizations which are in close contacts with EU bodies. Consistency in the use of terms in translations produced by various departments or institutions is a must for sound translations. Such an inconsistency leads to economic losses due to different interpretations of the same translated texts. In this regard, launching an EU-funded project on terminology called TermTurk became a must in order to attract the attention of private and public bodies to the importance of terminology. Accordingly, this paper presents the TermTurk project as a terminology policy case in Turkey.

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In the Czechoslovakia of the 1950s, traditional folk music was officially presented as the most important resource of national musical identity. Folk- or folk-inspired music was ubiquitous. Although this intensity had subsided in the following decades, the role of folk music as a symbol of national identity remained strong until the end of the communist rule in 1989. While the ideology of nationalism used folk music as its tool, it also influenced the way this music was collected, researched, and presented. The article presents examples from two closely related areas to document this phenomenon: folk music research and folk music revival. A closer look reveals how the idea of state-promoted nationalism influenced the ways researchers presented their findings, how they filtered out material that was deemed unsuitable for publication, and how traditional music was revived on stage or in media by folk music and dance ensembles. Critical analysis of research materials and audiovisual documents from the 1950s and 1960s will show how censorship accompanied a folk song from its collection in the field, through publication, to a stylized production on stage or in film.

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„Elle n'a point eu à subir […] la pourriture, les vers et la poussière…“

Remarques sur l'iconographie de la mort de Marie ŕ propos du triptyque d'Esztergom réalisé sous l'influ-ence du Maître du Retable du roi Albert

Acta Historiae Artium Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Anna Eörsi

Summary

During the XVth Century one seldom finds a representation of the Death of the Virgin as the central theme of a tryptich. The Holy Spirit floating over the globe is as unusual for the iconography of this theme, as are the diabolic beasts abounding in the ground. The latter, just as the fly and the spider on the bedside are meant as symbols of sin. The decoration of the deathbed of Mary is reminiscent of the representations of the Arc of the Covenant. The commission of the tryptich is to be seen in the context of contemporary discussions over the Immaculate Conception. However, it is not anymore possible for us to decide which side's arguments were meant to be supported by this painting. The apostle lifting up a censer belongs to the same Rahmenthemen as the doctor lifting up the uroscope.

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References ESPON . 2005 . Urban areas as nodes in a polycentric development . ESPON Project 1.1.1. Available at: http://www.espon.eu/main/Menu_Projects/Menu_ESPON2006Projects/Menu_Thematic Projects

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Corpus-based cross-linguistic studies that have examined the word-formation features of source vs. target texts and non-translated vs. translated language have found that source-language interference and language-pair specific properties noticeably influence the over- and underuse of certain affixes in the target language. They have also highlighted translation-related trends such as the normalization of creative lexis, which may lead to a marked morphological decrease in target texts vis-à-vis their source texts. This article sets out to investigate another facet of the word-formation features of source and target texts, viz. genre-sensitivity, by reporting on a case study of evaluative prefixation in English and French (e.g. mini-, super-, over-). The study is based on two translation corpora (TED Talks and Europarl), representing two spoken genres (oral presentations and parliamentary debates) and two written translation modes (subtitling and translation). The results show that English evaluative prefixation fulfills different functions in the two genres investigated (attitudinal stance in debates vs. intensification in presentations). Translation data also reveal striking differences between the two corpora, with TED Talks displaying a strong preference towards prefix-by-prefix translation. However, at this stage, it is difficult to assess to what extent this is due to source text genre, translation mode or translator expertise (TED Talks are subtitled by non-professional volunteers).

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