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Elgala, A. M., Metwally, A. I., Khalil, R. A. (1978): The effect of humic acid and Na2EDDHA on the uptake of Cu, Fe and Zn by barley in sand culture. Pl. Soil , 49 , 41-48. Pl. Soil

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Gupta, R. K., Raman, S., Raman, K. V. (1985): Adsorption of terbutryne on humic acid. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. , 33 , 255–259. Raman K. V

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Application of salt stress (100 mM) through root growing medium caused a considerable decrease in plant fresh and dry biomass, maximum quantum yield (F v/F m), chlorophyll contents, leaf water potential, and leaf Ca, K, P and N concentrations of two maize cultivars (Apex 836 and DK 5783). However, salt-induced increase was observed in leaf osmolality (LO), proline, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA), Na+ concentration and activities of enzymatic antioxidants, such as catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Of five humic acid (HA) levels used under non-stress and stress conditions in an initial experiment, 100 mg L−1 was chosen for subsequent studies. Exogenous application of humic acid (HA) at the rate of 100 mM as a foliar or pre-sowing seed treatment significantly increased the plant biomass, F v/F m, chlorophyll pigments and proline contents, while it considerably reduced the leaf water potential, H2O2 and MDA contents as well as the activities of all the afore-mentioned enzymatic antioxidants. Of both modes of exogenous treatment, foliar spray was better in improving plant biomass, chlorophyll contents, LO, leaf Na+ as well as the accumulation of all nutrients measured, however, in contrast, seed pre-treatment was more effective in altering leaf proline, H2O2 and MDA contents. Of both maize cultivars, cv. DK 5783 excelled in plant biomass, chlorophyll contents and leaf N, Ca and K concentrations as well as in the activities of all three antioxidant enzymes, whereas cv. Apex 836 was superior in leaf Na+ and P concentrations, H2O2 and MDA contents. Cv. DK 5783 was comparatively better in salt tolerance as compared to cv. Apex 836. Overall, exogenous application of HA was effective in improving salinity tolerance of maize plants which can be attributed to HA-induced increase in plant biomass, chlorophyll contents, mineral nutrients and activities of key antioxidant enzymes.

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, A. , Kaynar , D. , Turan , M. , Ercişli , S. ( 2016 ) Ameliorative effect of humic acid and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on Hungarian vetch plants under salinity stress . Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 47 , 602 – 618

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and combined with humic acid or/and chitosan on growth, nutrient elements content and yield of dry bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants sown at different dates . Scientia Horticulturae, 184 : 101 – 105

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18. Shehata AA , Kühnert M , Haufe S , Krüger M . Neutralization of the antimicrobial effect of glyphosate by humic acid in vitro . Chemosphere . 2014 ; 104 : 258

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1988 Camaron, R.S. — Swift, R.S. — Thronton, B.K. — Posner, A.M.: 1972. Calibration of gel permeation chromatography materials for use with humic acid

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Gonet, S. S., Wegner, K. (1993): Effect of long-term mineral and organic fertilizer application on properties of soil humic acids. Zes. Nar. H. Koll. Zes. Nauk. (Krakow) , 37 , 51–63. Wegner K

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Anderson, M. A., Hung, A. Y. C., Mills, D., Scott, M. S. (1995): Factors affecting the surface tension of soil solutions and solutions of humic acids. Oil Sci. , 160, 111-116. Factors

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