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Abstract

Hélio Oiticica was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1937, and belonged to the radical art avant-garde in Brazil. In 1957 he produced his first work, Metaesquema, after which he was part of the neo-concrete group that broke rank with the concrete group. In 1964 he produced his work Parangolé, a cape used by the members of the Mangeira samba school, and a work that had expressive social and political connotations. Oiticica wanted spectators to become involved in the Parangolé, i.e. to wear it and to see others wearing it. In the same year Oiticica created his work Tropicalia, an installation that includes a poem, sand, a parrot, a labyrinth and a TV. Two other spatial reliefs, Bilaterais and Bólides, involve visual contact, colour and emotions. Oiticica created the work Cosmococa as quasi-cinema, i.e. a mixture of film and installation. He died in Rio de Janeiro in 1980.

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The text deals with the work of Jana Želibská (1941 Olomouc) — flanêuse in the 1960s and the priestess of the Great Mother (Nature) in the 1970s. Želibská took a central position among male protagonists of neo-avant-garde in Slovakia. Her approach has been labeled ‘latent feminism’ because no real feminist platform existed during socialism in Slovakia. Želibská used the language of pop art and New Realism and their iconography mixed with the local folklore motifs in a quite different way. Pop art and New Realism entered the oeuvre of many artists simultaneously with experiments in conceptual art (Stano Filko, Peter Bartoš, Július Koller, Jana Želibská). After 1968, Želibská shifted the focus of her activities to land as an open structure outside of official supervision. Želibská made several statements regarding experiencing the magic of the present moment and experience with landscape through concepts and events that emphasized connection with nature. Photography helped her to work with continuity and causality in photo-sequences of situations and events. The path through ‘rooms of her own’ and other spatial concepts from the female labyrinth to the architecture of the temple in the 1960s, through changing open structures outdoors in her concept and land art in the 1970s, photography in 1980s, reached installation and video in the 1990s. Installations in the 1980s were built mainly on the artist’s experience with and in nature, or on the typical postmodernist contrast of the urban and natural. Puberty and virginity, which interested her in the land art events in 1970s, appeared again in her video art in a monumental demonstration of ‘girl power.’ In 1997 Želibská took the position behind the camera, shooting a naked male body without identity and face in the video installation Her View of Him. Thus she completed her shift from the ‘girl power’ of the 1960s and early 1970s agenda to fully articulated ‘woman power’.

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Abstract

The essay describes two copies of documents from the hand of Staatskanzler Wenzel Anton Kaunitz-Rietberg sent to the Swiss engraver and art dealer Christian von Mechel. The letters were written at the time when Mechel was involved with the installation of paintings from the Imperial collection in the Belvedere palace, Vienna. The first letter is dated June 14th, 1779, and tells of several paintings that Mechel had suggested the Austrian court; one being identified as “Decent from the Cross” by Sandrart, which was included in Mechel's Belvedere hanging, and is now to be found in Cluj/Klausenburg. The document also refers to four paintings by Teniers in Nymphenburg offered by Kurfürst Karl Theodore von Pfalz-Sulzbach, (from 1777 onwards also Kurfürst von Bayern), who had retained Mechel as his agent in this affair. These four works, showing the interior of Archduke Leopold Wilhelm's paintings gallery, could very well be the set of paintings now in the Bayrische Gemäldesammlung in Munich. This would suggest that the transfer to the Austrian court must have failed to happen for reasons not yet known. The second letter is dated July 28th, 1790 and reveals an increasing of impatience towards Mechel, who Kaunitz implys is causing delays in the completion of the gallery installation. Kaunitz further makes reference to a large painting by Frans Floris, which could correspond to “The Last Judgement” (ill. 4).

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This paper focuses on Vasily Shukshin’s “working records” dated from 1966. It is established that a lot of contexts and names are important for the interpretation of these records: from the antique myths to Russian literature. In the paper, it is proved that the motive of the waterway of a ship appears in Shukshin’s texts as the concentrated symbol of spiritual aspirations, warm rushes, as the allegory of movement towards the aim and the overcoming of obstacles. At the same time, it is also a symbol of moral ascension, which is shown by the reflections about intelligence as the aim of the artist. The conclusion drawn is that the poetics of Vasily Shukshin’s texts represents a very open and dialogical structure with wide referential installations.

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Abstract

The residents of Fremont neighborhood in Seattle Washington, witnessed the installation of a 16 feet, bronze statue of V. I. Lenin in June of 1995. The statue, which had formerly gazed upon the city of Poprad in Slovakia, had been purchased for $13,000 in 1993 by a local English teacher Lewis Carpenter, who came upon it in a scrap heap during his stay in Poprad. The ensuing debates that filled the local papers, questioned the appropriateness of the statue in the heart of Seattle's liberal business sector. What did it mean, they wondered, to have the leader of the October Revolution stride towards the fast food restaurant, Taco Del Mar. My paper argues that the reactivation of the monument's political meaning in Seattle was only possible because it moved outside the traditional channels of the museum and its protective walls.

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Summary

The present paper must be interpreted as a sequel of the work “Daten zu Leben und Werk des Pariser Architekten Charles Moreau zwischen 1760 und 1803”published in the Österreichische Zeitschrift für Kunst- und Denkmalpflege, Heft 4, 2001. This essay was finished when Moreau came to Vienna in the company of Prince Nikolaus II Esterházy at the end of 1803. The prince engaged the architect in Paris to lead the future works for the renewal of the family residence at Eisenstadt forming part of Hungary at this time. Moreau was quatered in the “Rothen Haus”which was situated in the Viennese suburb Alsergrund. In 1794 Prince Nikolaus II Esterházy became owner of the big family estates in the kingdom of Hungary. Shortly after his installation he engaged the French architect Jean-François Thomas de Thomon. He was responsible for the redesign of the garden of Nikolaus II in the Viennese suburb Landstraße, which was finished already in 1795. Surprisingly Thomas de Thomon quit his contract at the beginning of 1798 and went to Russia where he became architect of the tsar. Only at the end of 1802 Prince Esterházy employed another architect trained in Paris and Rome, Maximilian von Verschaffelt. Verschaffelt can be associated with the redesign of the garden in Eisenstadt and the alteration of the orangery still under construction. The other activities of Verschaffelt are not at hand. It seems that he was dismissed by the prince in favor of Charles Moreau in 1804. There is a good reason to believe that from 1804 on the activities followed to the directives of Charles Moreau because the first buildings invented and drawn by the architect were realized also at this time. In July 1804 the prince ordered the construction of the Marientempel which was situated north-west of Eisenstadt at the hillside of the Leithagebirge. At the same time the prince decreed the project for the Marientempel, he instructed the building department to start the works for the Maschinenhaus which was the first building designed by Charles Moreau for the landscape-garden. Among others it had to bare the steam-engine bought by the prince in London in 1803. Besides the mentioned activities the redesign of the old castle of Eisenstadt was started. According to the proposals of Charles Moreau the Prince ordered the beginning of the works in March 1805. First of all a passage under the north-wing and the basement for a representative portico flanked by two big ramps leading into the colonnade had to be constructed. Nikolaus II also started a project in Vienna in 1805. The work began in May 1805 and was not finished until 1807. Besides the works for Prince Nikolaus II Esterházy another client asked Moreau to design a palace in the city of Vienna. Elzbieta Anna Teofila Princess Lubomirska wanted to redesign several houses at the Mölkerbastei which defined an inner court. In the middle of 1806 Charles Moreau had to go back to Paris. He had been employed since the beginning of 1801 as “Architecte de la Sorbonne”. There is a good reason to believe that during his sojourn in Paris he visited not only his relatives but also his teachers, friends and old colleques. Virtually all of them were near Jacques-Louis David, the former teacher of Charles Moreau: Dominique Vivant Denon, François-Pascal-Simon Gérard and Antoine-Jean Gros, Charles-Paul Landon rival of Moreau and winner of the Grand prix de peinture as well as, among others, Jean-Baptiste Isabey who became a close collaborator of the architect during the Congress of Vienna. Although Nikolaus II was confronted with a proposal for the alteration and rearrangement of the so-called “Sauerbrunn”near Pöttsching – a new bath was mentioned for this place in 1805 – he decided to invest into the enlargement of a similar building already existing in Großhöflein. But at the beginning of 1807 there must have been some change of opinion and Charles Moreau was ordered to design a new bath not far from the old one. Another work of Moreau is located in Laxenburg where the Prince was responsible for the royal post-office and all its arrangements. It seems that the old station was too small. Therefore Nikolaus II ordered to enlarge the building by putting on a new flat and stables in 1805. He was also working on the new landscape gardens of the prince. When the garden of Pottendorf was nearly finished new hothouses were planned and built from the end of 1807. It was also in 1807 when the Prince possibly animated by the new constructions at Pottendorf ordered to construct new hothouses at Eisenstadt. A virtually new challenge was the design for a big festival-hall in the Viennese suburb, Schottenfeld, for which the Englishman Sigmond Wolfson made available his house and garden. The works for the building which consisted of several large rooms with different decorations was started in April 1807 and already finished in December of the same year. During the past years Charles Moreau and his family settled down in Vienna. In 1807 the painter Karl Johann Hummel charged him to design a new bath in the Viennese suburb Leopoldstadt. Moreau accepted and on Januray 1, 1808, they bought a big site near the Donaukanal. The idea to integrate the residences of both families into the complex must have been born at this time. Beside his activities in the service of Prince Esterházy, mainly in Eisenstadt, he was also commissioned to do other works. In 1811 Count Nikolaus Eszterházy gave a charge to the princely architect to redesign three houses situated between Walfischgasse and Krugerstraße in Vienna. The second work of Charles Moreau for the Count Esterházy was the design for a mausoleum for the deceased members of the family. Nagyganna was selected for it because of its geographical qualities. Also Count Johann Pálffy gave a contract to Charles Moreau. The count acquainted two houses in the Wallnerstraße in Vienna which were desolate from a fire-hazard. Moreau was ordered to redesign both buildings into a palace. The works done by Moreau in Austria and Hungary gave a lot of sympathy to the architect. The honoration was going so far that the council of the Akademie der vereinigten bildenden Künste in Vienna elected him as regular counsellor in 1812. Since Emperor Franz I did not confirm the decision there must have been some problems caused by the fact that Charles Moreau was no regular member of the institution at this time. So he became member of the academy in February 1812 and three months later he was nominated again for counsellor. But first on January 15, 1813, the emperor signed the letter of appointment.

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installation and use of radio-electrical stations and channels”, a law which also determined from the very beginning the state monopoly on radiotelegraphy. Within its legally granted authority, the Romanian Radiophonic Society (Societatea Română de Radiofonie

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III.3 Sándor Kántor: pretzel flask with red / Communist star on the first Folk Arts and Industrial Arts Exhibition. (Schubert – Balassa (eds.) 1953) Figure III.4 Sinicki: Installation of electricity on the Tundra, mammoth bone carving. ( Weiner 1952

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knowledge, the local heritage museum could be restored in Magyarlukafa, and the installation of the basic infrastructure needed for facilitating the day to day life of the village could be urged with reference to the camp. Katalin Kovács social scientist

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In conjunction with its 30th anniversary in 2009 the Sóstó Museum Village examined the question of how to move forward. The best solution appears to be to take two directions: on the one hand, strengthening of the professional standard can bring renewal by transferring to the museum types of buildings or installations that have a curiosity value arousing the public’s interest (brandy distillery, soda-water plant, photographic studio, etc.), and on the other hand, strengthening our educational efforts, providing attractions for the public. We had thought that with the implementation of our building transfer plan the construction of the museum village could be regarded as completed, but we found that this was a mistake: there is no such thing as a completed museum, we are constantly faced with new challenges and we can only meet the expectations of the public by strengthening education and entertainment, expanding themes and complex services, and it is only in this way that we can provide a greater feeling of comfort for visitors. But in achieving this we must take care to avoid the danger of commercialisation and the “Disneyland“ effect. The article is about the attainment of this goal.

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