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Writings about Korea in Korea and Japan) , Yeoksa hakbo (Korean historical Journal , Seoul) , 1966 (in Korean). 6. H. Kang 1974 : Kang, Hugh M

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. Пοgzοмοвка каров gля за рубезных см ран е совемскцх еузах 2003 Chanlett-Avery, Emma, and Ian E. Rinheart. 2013. North Korea: U

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. Choi , Y. R. ( 2000 ): 한국불교 의식무용의 기원과 정신 [The research of spirit and origin of Korean Buddhist ceremonial dance] . Korean Journal of History, Physical Education, Sports and Dance Vol. 6 , pp. 68 – 86

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. ( 1987 ): The Japanese Language Through Time . New Haven–London, Yale University Press. Martin , Samuel E. ( 1996 ): Consonant Lenition in Korean and the Macro

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Akiba , Takashi 1987: Choson musogui hyonji yon’gu (A Field Research on Korean Shamanism) . Taegu. Kyemyong Univ. Press. Akiba T. Choson musogui hyonji yon’gu 1987

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Publications . Vovin , A. ( 2003 ): Once Again on Lenition in Middle Korean. Korean Studies Vol. 27 , pp. 85 – 107

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The Bohai state existed in the modern southern part of the Russian Far East (Primor’e region), North Korea and Northeastern China from the late 7th to the early 10th century. Bohai influenced many states and tribes that existed close to this state and played an important role in international relations between Silla, Japan and the Tang Empire. At the same time, Bohai was subjected to important cultural influences from other countries and in some cases followed their rituals and diplomatic traditions. Many specialists from Japan, Russia, China and the two Korean states have done research on various aspects of Bohai history and culture. However, most of these scholars failed to pay attention to Bohai’s influence on the role of ritual and the status of states in its international relations. Western specialists have also neglected the investigation of this field. Bohai and Silla (another Korean state in the southern part of the Korean Peninsula) had hostile relations over two hundred years because they could not agree on their respective status vis-à-vis each other. For example, Silla did not want to recognise Bohai as a sovereign and independent state, although Bohai was recognised as such by China, while Silla was a vassal of the Tang Empire. This article critically analyses the relations between Bohai and Silla and elucidates the origin of the conflict between the two countries using Russian and Korean publications.

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) Lee , Hong-jik (comp.) ( 2005 ): (Enlarged) Encyclopedia of Korean History . Seoul . [ 李 弘稙 (編) ( 2005 ), (增補)새國史事典 , 서울 .] (The 19th impression of the first edition in 1983

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2003: Uchenye Respubliki Koreia ob otnosheniyah mezhdu gosudarstvami Silla i Bohaj (Ученые Республики Корея об отношениях между государствами Силла и Бохай / Scholars of the Republic of Korea on relations between Silla and Bohai). In: Arheologiia

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