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The toxicity of Melissa officinalis L. essential oil and its formulation (Melissacide) were evaluated against eggs and females of two predatory phytoseiid mites, Typhlodromips swirskii (Athias Henriot) and Neoseiulus barkeri (Hughes), using direct spray. Results indicate that both tested materials were potent on predatory females than egg stage. Typhlodromips swirskii was proved to be more sensitive to the oil and formulation than N. barkeri.

Females mortality were (62-100%) in T. swirskii, and (46-69%) in N. barkeri, when both predatory mites were sprayed with LC50 and LC90 of the oil and Melissacide reported on Tetranychus urticae Koch. Females of both predators were suffered from reduction in food consumption when sprayed with two sublethal concentrations of Melissacide, while insignificant differences reported in daily number of eggs deposited by females of T. swirskii, when sprayed with its LC25 value of Melissacide and control.

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), by Neoseiulus barkeri Hughes on papper. Bio. Cont. 4, 390–395. Petitt F. Biological control of broad mite, Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Banks), by Neoseiulus barkeri Hughes on papper

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Neoseiulus barkeri (Hughes) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) has been reported from Africa, Asia and Europe, often in association with Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), one of the most important pests of strawberry, cucumber and eggplant in different parts of the world. Neoseiulus barkeri is often observed for a limited time on plants in the absence of prey, feeding on alternative and supplementary foods and reaching high population levels. In this study, we test the hypothesis that various fungi (recorded in association with the host plant) could be suitable food source for the predatory mite N. barkeri . In the laboratory, we compared the developmental times, survival and oviposition rates of the predatory mite feeding on the primary food (T. urticae) or mycelium and spores of Aspergillus niger, Alternaria solani, Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum as alternative or supplementary food. Results indicated that the fungi, A. niger, A. solani and P. digitatum are adequate food sources for generalist mite survival and development. Neoseiulus barkeri was able to sustain oviposition when fed on the fungus A. niger , so it was proved to be an alternative food, conversely the predator failed to oviposit when fed on P. digitatum and A. solani , hence, both fungi can be consider as supplementary food for the predator. The fungus P. italicum is proved to be inadequate food, since most of protonymphs failed to complete its development and reach adult female. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feeding preference and the effect of food items (pest mite or fungi) commonly present on strawberry, cucumber and pepper in fields or greenhouses.

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, Y. L. ( 2013 ): Impact of proteins and saccharides on mass production of Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridae) and its predator Neoseiulus barkeri (Acari: Phytoseiidae) . Bio. Sci. Tec. 23 , 1231 – 1244

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163 170 Momen, F. M. and Hussein, H. (2011): Influence of prey stage on survival, development and life table of the predacious mite, Neoseiulus barkeri (Hughes) (Acari

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biological control: plenty of natural enemies, but a frustrating lack of uptake . Bio Control 57 , 1 – 20 . Xia , B. , Zou , Z. , Li , P. and Lin , P. ( 2012 ): Effect of temperature on development and reproduction of Neoseiulus barkeri

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Neoseiulus barkeri (Acari: Phytoseiidae) fed on Aleuroglyphus ovatus . Exp. Appl. Acarol. 56 , 33 – 41 .

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The direct toxicity of the essential oil Lavendula officinalis Chais to egg stage and adult females of the predacious mites, Euseius yousefi Zaher and El-Borolossy, Neoseiulus barkeri (hughes), Amblyseius zaheri Yousef and El-Borolossy and Typhlodromus athiase Porth and Swirski was studied. French Lavender oil was highly toxic to both stages of E. yousefi and relatively in toxic to T. athiase. A depression on consumption was recorded on A. zaheri and E. yousefi, while a depression on reproduction was reported only in case of E. yousefi, when females treated with LC25 concentration. French Lavender oil, at concentration of (LC25) was considered to be safe for A. zaheri, N. barkeri and T. athiase, since no mortalities had been recorded.

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The biology of Agistemus exsertus Gonzalez was studied to determine the suitability of different phytoseiid eggs as prey. The development was faster and reproduction was higher when A. exsertus fed on eggs of Amblyseius lindquisti Schuster and Pritchard, Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) and Amblyseius zaheri Yousef and El borolossy (6.57 days and 111.5 eggs; 6.71 days and 110.1 eggs and 6.93 days and 101.0 eggs) than that of Euseius scutalis Athias-Henriot, Neoseiulus barkeri (Hughes) and Amblyseius swiriskii Athias-Henriot (8.6 days and 63.1 eggs; 7.29 days and 52.0 eggs and 7.87 days and 37.7 eggs), respectively. A. exsertus consumed daily more N. barkeri and A. zaheri eggs (4.63 and 3.85) than other phytoseiid eggs, respectively. Deits of A. lindquisti, N. cucumeris and E. scutalis (eggs) provided the greatest female longevity and the least was in case of N. barkeri.

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Momen, F. M. (2010): Intra- and interspecific predation by Neoseiulus barkeri and Typhlodromus negevi (Acari: Phytoseiidae) on different life stages: Predation rates and effects on reproduction and juvenile development. Acarina 18, 81

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