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1 The article was written within the grant funded by Palacky University Olomouc with the reference no. of IGA_ PdF_2019_009 titled Renaissance Sepulchral Production in

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Werk: Gottfried Semper – Dresden und Europa. Die moderne Renaissance der Künste . Akten des Intern. Kolloquiums der Technischen Universität Dresden aus Anlass des 200. Geburtstags von Gottfried Semper, hrsg. v. H. Karge, München – Berlin 2007, S. 13 f

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The aim of this work is to provide a possible definition for Renaissance antiquarianism. This cultural pathway, which influenced the way the past was interpreted between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries, represented a methodological perspective which involved the cross-referencing of heterogeneous sources, strongly linked to mankind’s perception of time and that helped shape a renewed historical consciousness. Focus will be devoted to a possible history of the phenomenon and a general explanation of its methodology.

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5 (1871) S. 146. “Ami az épület külsejét illeti, egészében és részleteiben a modern renaissance idomait mutatja, s – közelebbi meghatározással – az u.n. berlini iskola terméke gyanánt mosolyog felénk. Ez iskolának kiváló vonása épen a gyöngéd

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Renaissance Music in Croatia is still little recognized in wider international context. In the study some general remarks on the topic are given, namely on theoreticians and academies, on folk music and early music print. More attention is given on sources of Renaissance polyphonic music and composers, such as motets and madrigals by J. Skjavetic (Schievetto) and L. Courtoys.

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Summary

The son of a rich German burgher family of Kassa (Kaschau, Košice, today Slovakia), György Szatmári got into state administration after his studies in Krakow. The king, Vladislav II of the Jagellonian Dynasty (1490–1516) recompensed him for his services in the royal chancellary by ecclesiastic prebends. Besides his episcopal duties, he took over the chancellary leadership in 1498 and became the actual mastermind of Hungarian politics in the early 16th century. He had his proteges study in Italy and supported financially several humanists who sang the renown of the generous patron in their literary works. At the onset of his career he had the St Michael chapel in Kassa extended in late gothic style where only a stone ornament with his coat of arms represents the new, Renaissance style. His episcopal constructions in Pécs (1505–21) already show him as a real Renaissance art patron. The extant Renaissance tabernacle of the cathedral was carved by a Florentine master of the workshop of the Bakócz chapel in Esztergom, which is also adorned with his coat of arms. He had the episcopal palace of Pécs and the chapter house rebuilt in Renaissance style, and had a villa erected upon Francesco di Giorgio's plans on a hill above the town. Except for the ruined villa, his constructions only survive in a few fragments. The last station of his ecclesiastic career was Esztergom (1521–24) where he had the archbishop's palace rebuilt. His tomb erected in the cathedral perished, only written records informing us of it. His breviary preserved in the Bibliothčque Nationale in Paris was illumined by Boccardino il Vecchio in Florence in the mid-1510s.

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The author’s monograph published in Hungarian in 2001 was the first attempt to give an overview of the theme of King Matthias Corvinus in Slovenian folk tradition and literature. This study provides some further details on this subject, suggesting a new interpretation of traditional folk texts about King Matthias Corvinus as texts of collective memory, collective narrative and collective identity. The myth of King Matthias Corvinus as a saviour strongly condenses how this exceptional soldier and possible crusade leader, who vanquishes the unbelievers and heretics, liberated this part of Europe from barbarism and instilled in it the spirit of humanism and the Renaissance.

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Abstract

In the present paper, Gogol’s story Vij is considered in the context of the metaplot about Medea (see Euripides and Seneca). The connection between the metaplot for Gogol and the Renaissance context is shown. For the sake of comparison, Akhmatova’s version of the Medea myth is also involved.

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Following K. Schumann's classification, the paper establishes 8 of the 23 possible types of loan translations and semantic loans in the Renaissance Croatian drama. At the same time, two new types of calquing are also identified: “Lehngebrauch der Rektionen von Verben und Substantiven” and “syntaktische Lehngebrauch der Rektionen der Lehnwörter”. In using loan translations or semantic loans the authors' individual choice is for the lexical types, while in terms of syntactic loans the widespread and generally accepted forms are preferred.

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Columbus' first letter on his revolutionary discoveries was first published in Spanish, but soon spread all over Europe in its Latin version. The first history of America was originally written in Latin by the Italian humanist Peter Martyr and the world came to know about its first circumnavigation again through a Latin text, written by the emperor's secretary Maximilianus Transylvanus. The role of the Latin language in this important phase of European historiography has always been limited to its function as the international European idiom. But even in the renaissance writing and reading in Latin was not as popular as English would be today. The true function of the Latin language in the historiography of early discoveries lies in its ability to integrate the experience of strange new worlds into European culture and thinking. Latinization worked as assimilation and played an imported role in the institution of a new, globalized European identity.

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