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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Roméo-Karl Imboumy-Limoukou, Sandrine Lydie Oyegue-Liabagui, Stella Ndidi, Irène Pegha-Moukandja, Charlene Lady Kouna, Francis Galaway, Isabelle Florent, and Jean Bernard Lekana-Douki

. Mathanga DP , Campbell CH , Vanden Eng J , Wolkon A , Bronzan RN , Malenga GJ , Ali D , Desai M : Comparison of anaemia and parasitaemia as indicators of malaria control in household and EPI-health facility surveys in

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Snežana Marković, Jovana Žižić, Ana Obradović, Branka Ognjanović, A. Štajn, Zorica Saičić, and M. Spasić

Bates, D. A., Winterbourn, C. C. (1984) Haemoglobin denaturation, lipid peroxidation and haemolysis in phenylhydrazine-induced anemia. Biochem. Biophys. Acta 798 , 84–87. Winterbourn C. C

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Anna Blázovics, Éva Sárdi, Klára Szentmihályi, L. Váli, Mária Takács-Hájos, and Éva Stefanovits-Bányai

Redox homeostasis can be considered as the cumulative action of all free radical reactions and antioxidant defences in different tissues, which provide suitable conditions for life. Transition metal ions are ubiquitous in biological systems. Beta vulgaris var. rubra (table beet root) contains several bioactive agents (e.g. betain, betanin, vulgaxanthine, polyphenols, folic acid) and different metal elements (e.g. Al, B, Ba, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Zn), which act on the various physiological routes. Therefore we studied the effect of this metal rich vegetable on element content of the liver in healthy rats. Male Wistar rats (n = 7) (200 ± 20 g) were treated with lyophilised powder of table beet root (2 g/kg b. w.) added into the rat chow for 10 days. Five healthy animals served as control. We found significant accumulation of Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn and P in the liver, which was proved by ICP-AES measurements. We suppose that the extreme consumption of table beet root can cause several disturbances not only in cases of healthy patients but, e.g. in patients suffering with metal accumulating diseases, e.g. porphyria cutanea tarda, haemochromatosis or Wilson disease-although moderate consumption may be beneficial in iron-deficiency anaemia and inflammatory bowel diseases.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: D. Boonkusol, A. Dinnyés, Mayurachat Sa-ardrit, Saovaros Svasti, Tassanee Faisaikarm, J. Vadolas, Suthat Fucharoen, and Yindee Kitiyanant

A major clinical feature of patients with thalassemia is growth retardation due to anemia, therefore, the hematological parameters, weanling weight and post-weanling weight of pups obtained from vitrifiedwarmed embryo transfers were studied for the first time in this report. Two-cell embryos of four transgenic (TG) thalassemic mouse lines (BKO, 654, E2, and E4) were produced by breeding four lines of TG thalassemic males to wild-type (WT) females (C57BL/6J) and were cryopreserved by vitrification in straws using 35% ethylene glycol. After transfer of vitrified-warmed embryos, hematological parameters, spleen index, weanling and post-weanling weight were determined in TG and WT viable pups. In the BKO and 654 mice significantly abnormal hematological parameters and spleen index were observed compared to WT, E2 and E4 mice. The weanling and post-weanling weights of BKO and 654 pups were significantly less than that of the age-matched WT pups. However, no significant differences in weanling and post-weanling weight were found between WT and E2-TG or E4-TG pups. In conclusion, the four transgenic mice lines produced from cryopreserved embryo transfer retain the phenotype of the natural breeding mice indicating that these banked embryos are appropriate for thalassemia model productions.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Khadiga G. Adham, Manal H. Farhood, Maha H. Daghestani, Nadia A. Aleisa, Ahlam A. Alkhalifa, Maha H. El Amin, Promy Virk, Mai A. Al-Obeid, and Eman M. H. Al-Humaidhi

One of the common causes of iron overload is excessive iron intake in cases of iron-poor anemia, where iron saccharate complex (ISC) is routinely used to optimize erythropoiesis. However, non-standardized ISC administration could entail the risk of iron overload. To induce iron overload, Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with subacute (0.2 mg kg−1) and subchronic (0.1 mg kg−1) overdoses of ISC for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Iron status was displayed by an increase in transferrin saturation (up to 332%) and serum and liver iron burden (up to 19.3 μmol L−1 and 13.2 μmol g−1 wet tissue, respectively) together with a drop in total and unsaturated iron binding capacities “TIBC, UIBC” as surrogate markers of transferrin activity. Iron-induced leukocytosis (up to 140%), along with the decline in serum transferrin markers (up to 43%), respectively, mark positive and negative acute phase reactions. Chemical stress was demonstrated by a significant rise (p > 0.05) in indices of the hemogram (erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, leukocytes) and stress metabolites [corticosterone (CORT) and lactate]. Yet, potential causes of the unexpected decline in serum activities of ALT, AST and LDH (p > 0.05) might include decreased hepatocellular enzyme production and/or inhibition or reduction of the enzyme activities. The current findings highlight the toxic role of elevated serum and liver iron in initiating erythropoiesis and acute phase reactions, modifying iron status and animal organ function, changing energy metabolism and bringing about accelerated glycolysis and impaired lactate clearance supposedly by decreasing anaerobic threshold and causing premature entering to the anaerobic system.

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Harless, W., Crowell, E., Abraham, J. (2006) Anemia and neutropenia associated with copper deficiency of unclear etiology. Am. J. Hematol. 81 , 546–549. Abraham J. Anemia and

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159 168 Perry, T. L., Robinson, G. C., Teasdale, J. M., Hansen, S. (1967) Concurrence of cystathioninuria, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and severe anemia. N. Engl. J. Med

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underlying Fanconi anemia ? Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 37 , 49 – 60 . 6. Estrada , J. C. , Torres , Y. , Benguría , A. , Dopazo , A. , Roche , E. , Carrera-Quintanar , L

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. Lucca , P. , Hurrell , R. , Potrykus , I. 2002 . Fighting iron deficiency anemia with iron-rich rice . J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 21 : 184 S–190S. Masuda , H. , Ishimaru

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such as glanders, equine contagious pneumonia, equine viral arteritis, equine infectious anaemia, and mange in military horses because of extensive veterinary preventive and police measures including vaccinations and epidemiological investigations in

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