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In September 1939, within a short span of time, Poland was attacked by Germany from the west and the Soviet army from the eastern borders. According to a previous diplomatic agreement, the Polish government fled to Romania. Noting these events, while resisting political and military constrictions, Hungary opened its borders to the fleeing Polish civilians and to members of the military force to offer refuge. In fact, more than a hundred thousand Polish citizens found asylum in Hungary at that time. At this historical point, Stanisława Rogińska and her daughter Halina Waroczewska fled from Warsaw, and after crossing the Hungarian border settled first at Szob, then moved to Klotildliget, Leányfalu, and finally to Keszthely at Lake Balaton. The writing, based on their memories, presents the dramatic moments of crossing the border and of getting established in those first difficult months. The memoir also illustrates the historically honoured Hungarian–Polish friendship, which at this time was forced by events outside of either nation’s control. It also illuminates the noblest pages of Hungarian history.

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The kidnapping on February 15, 1999 of the Kurdish leader Abdullah Öcalan outraged the Kurdish community in Germany, and the Kurdish-Kurdish conflict was translated onto the streets and schoolyards of a number of major German cities. The local and national authorities turned to the teachers to help them in the battle against racism and xenophobia. Several educators, in turn, had long before anticipated the problem and had written, translated, published books for the younger generation that address themselves to the problem of the “Other” generally; several books have also tried to answer the troubling question: “Where would you find Kurdistan on the map?” For the German reading public this question had been satisfactorily answered back in 1881 by the still popular travel writer Karl May. The urgency of the question, however, has been revived during the last two decades. The authors have written to inform and to rouse the interest and sympathy of their readers; they have also contributed to the inter-cultural and -religious dialogue that the German authorities deemed so necessary.

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A driving force in Vergil’s Aeneid is the hostility of Juno to the Trojans as they approach, and finally arrive in Italy. The epic in some ways mirrors the opposition encountered by Augustus as the new ruler of Rome. Juno’s opposition to the Trojans has its origin not only in Greek mythology, but in the history of the local peoples of Italy with whom early Romans had to contend. From the outset of the poem she becomes the personification of these opposing forces. Once the Trojans finally reach mainland Italy, she sets in motion a long war, although the one depicted in the Aeneid was not as long as the real wars Romans waged with the Latin League and with the many of the tribes of Italy, including the Veii. The reality of the wars Rome had to contend with are here compared to the relatively brief one depicted in the Aeneid, and the pacification of Juno reflects the merging of the different peoples of Rome with their subjugator.

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The author suggests new etymologies for two well-known Old Russian proper names. The god name of Simarĭglŭ/Semarĭglŭ is loaned from East Iranic (Scytho-Sarmatian) of the Alanic Caucasian period and corresponds to Ossetic xī/xe ‘oneself’ and maræg ‘murderer; killing’, xemaræg ‘suicide (person)’ and the Russian participle suffix -l-. The motive of god’s suicide is extended in mythology, including the Nart epic. The ethnonym Khinova mentioned in “The Tale of Igor’s campaign“ is of Baltic origin and comes from IE *skū-n- ‘asylum, shelter; shield, etc.’ and the suffix -ava/-uva, very frequent in the Baltic ethnonymics.

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. Pöllabauer , S. 2004 . Interpreting in Asylum Hearings: Issues of Role, Responsibility and Power . Interpreting Vol. 6 . No. 2 . 143 – 180 . Roberts , R

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of Refugees and Asylum Seekers in the UK Press . Discourse and Society 19 . No. 3 . 273 – 306 doi: 10.1177/0957926508088962 Baker , M. 1995

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. Képek, elképzelések a Káli-medencében [Tourism as an Asylum. Images, Concepts in the Káli-Basin] . In Fejős , Zoltán – Szijártó , Zsolt (ed) Turizmus és kommunikáció [Tourism and Communication] , 7 – 22 . Budapest — Pécs : Néprajzi Múzeum

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Conclusion  

In his correspondence Rousseau’s unfolding of character shows him to be a brilliant polemicist when pushed against the wall by religious fanaticism. That brilliance manifests itself in the sharpness of his argument, the clarity of his images and the combative vocabulary which he can summon effortlessly. On the religious issue his letters are full of sarcasm, indignation and regret. This is the outcome of his encounter with theodium theologicum, that non-filterable virus which forced him to uproot himself frequently and traverse the map of Europe seeing respite and asylum. The letters contain relatively little on the substantive issues raised in theological discourse; they reflect Rousseau’s response to the unfortunate result of that discourse as they were concretized in his own life through persecution and ostracism. It is not surprising, therefore that the letters are a kind of sermon in which Rousseau calls for an ecumenical approach to religion in which, as he put it in theLettre de la Montagne, where there can be “de grands changements dans les coeurs, des conversions sans clat, de la foi sans dispute, du zle sans fanatisme, de la raison sans impit”.

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Goffman, E. 1968. Asylums: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates . Harmondsworth: Penguin. Goffman E. Asylums: Essays on the

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3 36 United States Government Accountability Office. 2010. “Humanitarian Assistance: Status of North Korean Refugee Resettlement and Asylum in the United States.” Report to

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