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Thucydides claims to have narrated each event in chronological sequence only in the Peloponnesian War, and even there he sometimes departs from that principle for narrative convenience. In the account of the Pentecontaetia in I 89–118. 2 events have likewise been grouped for narrative convenience, but in 103. 4–111 alternation between Greece and Egypt suggests events occurring about the same time, and Egyptian documents and the narrative dates of Diodorus Siculus do not disprove that.

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The first part of the paper deals with the literary genre of chronica in late Antiquity and its basic characteristics, paying special attention to the chronological aspects in these works. In the second part the author Iohannes Biclarensis is introduced. He lived in the 6th and 7th century in the Visigothic kingdom on the Iberian Peninsula and his only surviving work, the Chronica, is a one-of-a-kind source for the turbulent reigns of Leovigild and Reccared at the end of the 6th century AD. In the third part I focus on the significance of chronology in this opus, I present an analysis of all the dating formulas he uses and in the conclusion I demonstrate on some examples the shift in Iohannes’ perspective through the chronicle.

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This paper discusses the Mithraic reliefs found in Etruria (Regio VII). The reliefs are analysed and their iconographic, archaeological and chronological features compared with a view to advancing new proposals on the cult of Mithras in the area concerned. The paper focuses first on the new Mithraic relief discovered in Veii and discusses the presence of a specific object that constitutes the most original iconographic feature of the relief. It can be seen aligned behind Mithras' head, which obscures its central part: considering its shape and the presence of the quiver over Mithras' right shoulder, the object can be identified as a bow. The object's specific position, probably connected to the symbolic importance of the bow in the mysteries of Mithras, is unique not only among Mithraic reliefs but also in the surviving Mithraic evidence from the Roman world. The other reliefs from Etruria are analysed, with a brief description of the type of iconography, the chronology and archaeological context of each piece. Comparing the reliefs allows us to pinpoint differences in size, style and chronology, highlighting the uniqueness of the new relief from Veii. These differences can be put down to factors that are yet to be examined in more detail, connected to the clients and the workshops operating in the region. The study concludes that the Veii relief can be considered not only the oldest and most stylistically refined of these pieces, but also one of the earliest attestations of the cult of Mithras in Etruria.

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: Radiocarbon dates and absolute chronology of the Central European Early Bronze Age. Antiquity 67 (1993) 218–220, 235–256. Forenbaher S. Radiocarbon dates and absolute chronology of the

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The Hegykő cemetery (and the Hegykő group) has strong ties with the 6th-century cemeteries of Lower-Austria both regarding its material culture and its funerary rites, and thus any interpretation must be set in this context. The comparative analysis of the cemetery’s two grave groups sheds light on the tendency that the community using the cemetery gradually acculturated to the population using the 6th-century cemeteries of Pannonia.

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Raczky 1982 = P. Raczky : Adatok a bodrogkeresztúri kultúra déli kapcsolataihoz és kronológiájához (Data to the Southern Connections and Chronology of the Bodrogkeresztúr Culture). ArchÉrt 109 (1982) 177

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This paper is meant to re-examine the relative (and, at some points, absolute) chronology of some Early Greek changes of the occlusive phonemes (i.e. devoicing of Proto-Indo-European voiced aspirates, assibilation and palatalizations) and to point out some apparent questions and problems concerning the occlusive system as a whole.

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The aim of the present paper is to give an overview on the issue of the archaeological investigations of the chronology of medieval settlements in Hungary. After a brief introduction dealing with theoretical and/or methodological questions, a description of the literature is given in order to explain a rather chaotical picture of a graphic image of settlement dating (Fig. 1) . In the last chapter of the paper one can find an attempt to give a schema for a frame-like — i. e. not exact — dating of medieval settlements in Hungary (Fig. 2) .

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2003 V. C habai : The chronological and industrial variability of the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in Eastern Europe . In: The Chronology of the

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The first prominent creation of the Hungarian romantic architecture is Count István Károlyi’s (1797–1881) church in Fót. It attributes to its importance that it was designed by the young Miklós Ybl (1814–1891), and the similar artistic principles and imagination of the Maecenas and the architect created a harmonic set of buildings (church, parsonage, school). The study outlines the known facts of the church, and based on those, attempts to assemble the church’s iconography and chronology.

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