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Vedel, E., Emmelkamp, P. M., Schippers, G. M. (2008) Individual cognitive behavioral therapy and behavioral couples therapy in alcohol use disorder: a comparative evaluation in community-based addiction treatment centers. Psychotherapy, Psychosomatics

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Abramowitz, J., Franklin, M. E., Foa, E. B. (2002) Empirical status of cognitive behavioral therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder. Romanian Journal of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, 2, 89

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Roser Granero, Susana Valero-Solis, Fernando Fernández-Aranda, Mónica Gómez-Peña, Laura Moragas, Teresa Mena-Moreno, Amparo del Pino-Gutierrez, Ester Codina, Virginia Martín-Romera, Gemma Casalé, Zaida Agüera, Isabel Baenas-Soto, Eduardo Valenciano-Mendoza, Bernat Mora-Maltas, Isabel Sánchez, María Lozano-Madrid, José M. Menchón, and Susana Jiménez Murcia

of studies to date have examined the effectiveness of different evidence-based treatment approaches for GD, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), participate in self-help groups, motivational interviewing, mindfulness, pharmaceutical treatments

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Treating Obesity with Personalized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Az elhízás személyre szabott kognitív viselkedésterápiás kezelése

Mentálhigiéné és Pszichoszomatika
Authors: Riccardo Dalle Grave, Massimiliano Sartirana, Marwan El Ghoch, and Simona Calugi
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Abstract

Fears of specific and real dangers are adaptations. Hypophobia, a lack of adaptive aversive emotions in dangerous situations, is often maladaptive. Anxiety disorders also appear maladaptive, and many ethological suggestions about adaptive function are unconvincing from a clinical perspective. Modern and effective treatment (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) is based on changing disorder specific cognitive and metacognitive processes. Earlier thinking on the adaptive function of different types of anxiety and the downplaying of the specificity of different anxiety disorders is challenged. A combination of the cognitive sciences Evolutionary Psychology and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy might be fruitful. Evolutionary Psychology may provide Cognitive Behavioural Therapy with a better understanding of the function of the mental mechanisms involved, while Cognitive Behavioural Therapy may provide Evolutionary Psychology with a better understanding of the proximate mechanisms of specific mental disorders.

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brief cognitive behavior therapy for schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 35 (5), 859–864. Chadwick, P., Birchwood, M., Trower, P. (1996) Cognitive Therapy for Delusions, Voices and Paranoia . John Wiley and

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Patients attended cognitive-behavioral therapy delivered by doctoral-level clinical psychologists and completed self-monitoring reports of pornography consumption (daily) and anxiety (weekly; Figure 1 ). Figure 1

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Réka Borbála Tamás, Dóra Perczel-Forintos, Orsolya Máté, and Zsuzsanna Gyenge

–335. 6 Gallai M. Cognitive behaviour therapy of somatic symptom disorder in childhood. In: Perczel-Forintos D, Mórotz K. (eds.) Cognitive behavior therapy. [Szomatizációs zavarok kognitív

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Devlin, M. J., Goldfein, J. A., Petkova, E., Jiang, H., Raizman, P. S., Wolk, S., Mayer, L., Carino, J., Ballace, D., Kamenetz, C., Dobrow, I., Walsh, B. T.: Cognitive-behavioural therapy and fluoxetine as adjuncts to group behavioural therapy for binge

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. Psychiatry, 2003, 53 (9), 817–826. 24 Kliem, S., Kröger, C.: Prevention of chronic PTSD with early cognitive behavioral therapy. A meta-analysis using mixed

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