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this study, core samples from boreholes situated in the area of Sopron near the western border of Hungary (Fig.  1 ) were analyzed. Samples are classified as fine-grained (0.125–0.25 mm) sandstone (Fig.  2a ), medium-grained sandstone (matrix 0

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possible to investigate the shear zone. These drilling chips consist of mm-sized debris and contain single mineral and rock pieces in an 80:20 ratio; these pieces are dominated by quartz grains. Fig. 1 The Mecsekalja

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Central European Geology
Authors: Arnold Gucsik, Tasuku Okumura, Hirotsugu Nishido, Ildikó Gyollai, Kiyotaka Ninagawa, Natalie Deseta, and Péter Rózsa

Quartz grains from the Ries impact structure containing shock-induced microstructures were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy in cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL), secondary electron (SEM-SE) and back-scattered electron (SEM-BSE) modes as well as Mott–Seitz analysis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the mechanism by which CL detects Planar Deformation Features (PDFs) in quartz, which is one of the most important indicators of shock metamorphism in rock-forming minerals. PDFs are micron-scale features not easily identified using optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The CL spectrum of PDFs in quartz that has suffered relatively high shock pressure shows no or a relatively weak emission band at around 385 nm, whereas an emission band with a maximum near 650 nm is observed independent of shock pressure. Thus, the ~385 nm intensity in shocked quartz demonstrates a tendency to decrease with increasing shock metamorphic stage, whereas the 650 nm band remains fairly constant. The result indicates that the emission band at 385 nm is related to the deformed structure of quartz as PDFs.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Ildikó Gyollai, Ildikó Gyollai, Szaniszló Bérczi, Krisztián Fintor, Szabolcs Nagy, and Arnold Gucsik

. Greenwood , R.C. , B. Schmitz , J.C. Bridges , R. Hutchison , I.A. Franchi 2007 : Disruption of the L chondrite parent body: New oxygen isotope evidence from Ordovician relict chromite grains . – Earth and Planetary Science Letters 262

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Central European Geology
Authors: Ildikó Gyollai, Ákos Kereszturi, Zsolt Kereszty, Máté Szabó, and Elias Chatzitheodoridis

olivine grains varies between 5 and 200 μm; in recrystallized glassy chondrules, they are usually around 5 μm in diameter. Olivine clasts in shock veins and those in the melt pockets are 20–30 μm in size; whereas in chondrules, there are many 50- to 150-μm

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., J. N. Boland, M. S. Paterson 1977: Superplastic flow in fine grained limestone. - Tectonophysics, 43, pp. 257 - 291 . Superplastic flow in fine grained limestone. - Tectonophysics

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Interstellar grains in primitive meteorites — Diamond, silicon carbide, and graphite Meteoritics 28 490 514 . C

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34 327 333 . M Takahashi 1997 Fossil spores and pollen grains of Cretaceous (Upper Campanian) from Sakhalin, Russia

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: Grain size distribution and depositional processes. - Jour. Sed. Pet., 39/3, Tulsa. Visscher, H., 1971: The Permian and Triassic of the Kingscourt outlier, Ireland. - Bull. Geol. Surv. Ireland, Spec. paper, 1, pp. 1

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the Oligocene, fine-grained (hemi-) pelagic sediments were deposited, e.g., the Tard Clay Formation and the Kiscell Clay Formation. The former is characterized by high TOC content, having reached the oil window during the Pliocene (5 Ma); therefore

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