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9 , 1069 – 1076 . Kozár , F. ( 2009 ): Scale insect species (Hemiptera, Coccoidea) and climate change studies on Hungarian highways . Növényvédelem 45 , 577 – 588 . Kozár , F. and Viktorin , R. A. ( 1978 ): Survey of scale insect

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In the present paper two species of leafhoppers (Cicadomorpha, Cicadellidae) are reported for the first time from Hungary. Both species were collected from ornamental plants along highway margins in the vicinity of Budapest. Liguropia juniperi (Lethierry, 1876) has already been reported from several European countries. Opsius smaragdinus Emeljanov, 1964 has only been previously reported from Ukraine and Asian part of Turkey.

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Survey of aphids on dicotyledonous herbaceous plants along the Hungarian highways on 33 sampling points revealed the presence of aphid infestation on Artemisia vulgaris L. in 4 locations. Macrosiphoniella artemisiae (Boyer de Fonscolombe, 1841) colonies were present on the youngest parts of the shoots each place. On one of the locations the gall forming Cryptosiphum artemisiae Buckton, 1789 was present. Gall containing shoots of the mugwort were collected to rear aphid nymphs to adult. On these shoots the overlooked Brachycaudus cardui Linnaeus, 1758 individuals developed into apterae. Artemisia absinthium L. was present on one location. This plant accommodated Macrosiphoniella absinthii (Linnaeus, 1758).

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(Cruciferae) in the flora of Bulgaria . Phytologia Balcanica 13 , 153 – 178 . Basky, Zs. ( 2015 ): Brachycaudus species on herbaceous plants along highways in Hungary . Acta Phytopathol. et Entomol. Hung. 50 , 67 – 75 . Blackman , R. L. and

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A recent floristic and environmental survey was undertaken on the roadside verges along the main highway between El Arish and Rafah (31° 10'N, 33° 48'E and 31° 17'N, 34° 15'E) that extend for about 45 km on the northeastern Mediterranean coast of Sinai (Egypt). 63 stands were studied at 700-m intervals to represent the variation of vegetation, and to compile the floristic composition of the study area. Four main landform zones were distinguished (from the seashore inwards) and run parallel to the roadway: (A) coastal plain, (B) saline depressions, (C) sand plains and (D) sand dunes. There is a gradual increase in the total number of recorded species in the recognized landform units. Application of TWINSPAN analysis yielded 18 vegetation groups (VG) that comprised 7 main vegetation types (VT). These vegetation types were (I) Artemisia monosperma in the sand dunes, (II) Artemisia monosperma-Echinops spinosus in the sand plains, coastal plain and sand dunes, (III) Cyperus capitatus-Ammophila arenaria in the sand dunes, (IV) Ammophila arenaria-Pancratium maritimum in the coastal plain, (V) Zygophyllum album, (VI) Arthrocnemum macrostachyum and (VII) Arthrocnemum macrostachyum-Zygophyllum album in the saline depressions. Ordination techniques of Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) were used to examine the relationship between the roadside vegetation and the 8 studied environmental variables: total soluble salts (TSS), pH, calcium carbonate (CaCO_), sand, fine fractions (silt and clay), distance from the seashore (DFS), landform units (LF) and altitude (Alt). Both ordination techniques indicated that soil salinity, calcareous sediments, soil texture, landform, altitude and distance from seashore were the most important factors for the distribution of the vegetation pattern along the road verges in the study area. These gradients were related closely to the first three CCA axes, and accounted for 72.4% of the species relationship among the stands. Low species richness in the vegetation types of the coastal plain and saline depressions may be related to their high soil salinity, while the high species diversity and the highest share of alien weeds of vegetation types characterized the sand dunes may be related to the high disturbance of their substrates as a result of agriculture practising, farming processes and other excessive human disturbances.

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830 Federal Highway Administration. 2001. National Highway Planning Network, Version 3.0 . Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Washington, DC

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Gurrutxaga, M., L. Rubio and S. Saura. 2011. Key connectors in protected forest area networks and the impact of highways: A transnational case study from the Cantabrian Range to the Western Alps (SW Europe). Landscape Urban Plan. 101: 310

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WSW if Innisfail town, along the Palmerston Highway, epiphyl- lous in lowland rainforest with scattered Agathis robusta trees, at 375 m elev. T. Pócs, H. Streimann 99117/AN (CANB, EGR). A Malesian-Melanesian species distributed from the Malay

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Minisztérium és a Mezőgazdasági Minősítő Intézet közös kiadványa, pp. 201-202. Albasel, N., Cottenie, A. 1985: Heavy metal contamination near major highways, industrial and urban areas in Belgian grassland. Water, Air and

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Survey of aphids on dicotyledonous herbaceous plants along the Hungarian highways on 33 sampling points revealed the presence of 14 aphid species on gymnosperm trees. The most frequent conifer species was: Pinus nigra J. F. Arnold 1785 (21 locations) followed by Pinus sylvestris L.1753, Picea abies (L.) H. Karst. (4 locations), Juniperus communis L. 1753 (3 locations) and Juniperus virginiana L. 1753 (1 location), Thuja occidentalis L.1753 (2 locations), Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don (1 location).

Eulachnus agilis (Kaltenbach, 1843) was the most frequently collected aphid species on Pinus nigra, followed by Cinara brauni Börner, 1940, Cinara schimitscheki Börner, 1940, Eulachnus rileyi (Williams, 1911) and Cinara acutirostris Hille Ris Lambers, 1956. The less frequent Cinara species was Cinara piniphila (Ratzeburg, 1844) which is a new record for the Hungarian fauna. Pinus sylvestris accommodated three aphid species: Cinara intermedia Pašek, 1954 was the most frequent, followed by Cinara pinea (Mordvilko, 1895) and Eulachnus agilis. Picea abies accommodated Cinara piceae, Cinara pruinosa (Hartig, 1841), Cinara piceicola (Cholodkovsky, 1896) and Sacchiphantes abietis L. 1758. Juniperus communis and J. virginiana most frequently hosted Cinara juniperi (De Geer, 1773). Eulachnus agilis occurred once on Juniperus communis. A single aphid species Cinara tujafilina was found on Thuja occidentalis and Thuja plicata.

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