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Crop productivity is greatly influenced by various environmental stresses, of which insect herbivory-induced biotic stress assumes much significance. As a consequence of insect herbivory, a number of plant biochemical processes involved in the tolerance mechanism are affected. Different studies have demonstrated a diverse functional role of various plant oxidative enzymes in protecting plants against biotic stress induced by insect herbivory. Comprehensive profiling of stress-associated plant oxidative enzymes is most relevant to successful molecular breeding of stress-tolerant crop plants. Thus, better understanding of the biochemical basis of plant defense mechanisms is imperative, not only from a basic science perspective, but also for biotechnology-based pest control practice. In this review, we emphasize the potential role of various oxidative enzymes in plant defense against insect herbivory.

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19 291 298 Chapman, S. K., S. C. Hart, N. S. Cobb, T. G. Whitham and G. W. Koch. 2003. Insect herbivory increases litter quality and decomposition

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Bi, J. L., Felton, G. W. (1995) Foliar oxidative stress and insect herbivory: primary compounds, secondary metabolites, and reactive oxygen species as components of induced resistance. J. Chem. Ecol. 21 , 1511

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391 412 Clay, K., Marks, S., Cheplick, C. P. (1993) Effects of insect herbivory and fungal endophyte infection on competitive interactions among grasses. Ecology 74 , 1767

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139 123 136 Brown, V.K., M. Jepsen, M. and C.W.D. Gibson. 1988. Insect her-bivory: effects on early old-field succession demonstrated by chemical

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. Lichens as indicators of forest health in Canada . The Forestry Chronicle 82 : 335 – 343 . Throop , H.L. and M.T. Lerdau . 2004 . Effects of nitrogen deposition on insect herbivory

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