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Summary

The paper analyses the textual and visual representations of King Matthias Corvinus in the light of Antique physiognomical theories. I intend to focus mainly on those descriptions and portraits which were influenced by the lion's physiognomy. The last chapter deals also with the portraits of Matthias, but with the Attila-faun-like images. The Antique theories of physiognomy have contributed to a more exact interpretation of his images and the physiognomical comparison has resulted a more shaded picture about his iconography, even in the case of the Attila-faun-type portraits where we cannot study such clear-cut intentions. Due to the research we can place plausibly the leonine images of King Matthias among the Renaissance state-portraits after having taken into consideration the king's political intentions as well. The examination of the sources has resulted that the role of Galeotto Marzio must have been crucial in mediating the physiognomical theories towards the Buda court. I have also demonstrated that in his work physiognomy appears as an element of the theoriesrelated to good governance.

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The minuet was an integral part of multi-movement instrumental works of the Viennese Classical period, as well as playing a central role in eighteenth-century study of composition. During the nineteenth century, it was the scherzo that took over its didactic role,, which involved a shift of accent from a dance-like musical type to a kind of character piece. The variety of what “scherzo” could mean in the nineteenth century is probably the reason why there are relatively many scherzo and scherzando movements in Bartók's oeuvre. He encountered the genre quite early, already before and then during his studies of composition. The sum of his scherzos will be examined regarding tradition and originality, and also as to the intentions he had after his studies whenever he chose to compose a “scherzo.”

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Avantgarde und Faschismus

Anmerkungen zum Für und Wider einer fragwürdigen Gleichsetzung in der westeuropäischen kunstwissenschaftlichen Literatur zu Ende des 20. Jahrhunderts

Author: Lia Linder

Summary

Jean Clairs book “Die Verantwortung des Künstlers. Avantgarde zwischen Terror und Vernunft”, published in German language 1998, was immediately followed by numerous reactions, e.g. Peter Bürger, Werner Hofmann, Martin Warnke. As Nicos Hadjinicolaou however showed, Avantgarde and Modernism being blamed to be entangled with totalitarian regimes, started earlier. Jürgen Habermas, 1982, in “Die Kulturkritik der Neokonservativen in den USA und in der Bundesrepublik” also draw the attention to this kind of attitude towards Avantgarde. Following Clairs thesis it was not possible to talk about the “negative” sides of Avantgarde, because of the American policy in Europe after World War II, when Modern art became a political dogma. Only after the fall of communism it was possible to discuss this chapter of Avantgarde. The vehemence of these incriminations against Avantgarde and Modernism leads to questions about the intentions and the background: Is it possible that this debate newly confirms Habermas'thesis “technische Moderne ja, kulturelle Moderne nein”? Are we again confronted with a battle abstract versus figurative art? Platons remarks about painting in Republic 10, were often misused against abstract art, especially in the 20th century. Still hardly known is Ernst Cassirers highly differenciated essay within here, also the Hungarian contributions of the philo-sopher Mihály Polányi and Frigyes Karinthy.

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The article is the fourth part of a series analysing the lexicographical presence of Italian in Hungarian language: after names of persons places and institutions the Author focuses now on trade marks. She shows the specialities of this sector of the lexicon: the intentions of marketing, the lexicalization process and the high speed of changes. She provides a large range of examples, cathegorized by a linguistical tipology: abbreviations, derived and composed names, sintagmatical and phrasal ones.

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strategies to cope with vagueness and subtleties and they constantly need to test their own assumptions and the interlocutor’s intentions (which may not be revealed from the beginning or may change in the course of the discussions). In the words of

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characterizes belief narratives where the narrative core (encounter–conflict–consequences) is enriched by a segment that includes an attempt to remove the conflict. In these examples, the narrator talks about the intentions of banning or at least weakening the

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development of motifs depend on individual storytelling inclinations and intentions. Therefore, the development of stories about magical healing varies from highly developed narratives that include a series of details, from comments, and evaluations (see

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level translations depends on the author’s assessment of the needs and expectations of the SL audience, the author’s intentions and the function of the text – just like in regular interlingual translation. Since it is embedded in a different culture, a

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concerning the Thirty Years’ War. Perhaps in future it may be considered worth notice as a source of some value in itself (somewhat in the vein of postcolonial literature). The source (its origin and specificity); the author’s motivations and intentions

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rapprochement intellectuel franco-hongrois. Quoi qu’il en soit, il semble que Sauvageot n’a pas retenu ou n’a pas été dans l’obligation de retenir longtemps “le conseil amical” de Marx. De fait, il était, à Budapest, le mieux informé des intentions du

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