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References Avery , Peter and William Idsardi . 2001 . Laryngeal dimensions, completion and enhancement . In T. A. Hall (ed.) Distinctive feature theory. Berlin & New York : Mouton de Gruyter . 41 – 70 . Backley , Phillip

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The paper deals with two questions of the Vedic augment. Firstly, the Vedic forms with an apparently long syllabic augment are re-examined and the conclusion is drawn that these forms are due to phonological and analogical processes and do not form evidence in favour of an original long variant of the syllabic augment. Secondly, the temporal augment of vowel-initial roots is considered, which consists of the vrddhi of the initial vowel. An important analogical support for this general Old Indian rule is pointed out, namely the influence of those verbal stems that began with *Hei-, *Heu- or *Her- and had full or lengthened grade roots in the preterit tenses and therefore had phonetically regular vrddhi vowels in their augmented forms.

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Emancipating lenes

A reanalysis of English obstruent clusters

Acta Linguistica Academica
Author: Péter Szigetvári

obstruents may simply not be adjacent in English. The views presented in this paper have been aired earlier by, e.g., Twaddell (1935) ; Jones (1967) ; Davidsen-Nielsen (1969); Cyran (2014) . I am here driving the idea through the laryngeal phonology of

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lines, spreading place features to the nasal affix /n/ does not take place when the first radical is a laryngeal segment, so /n/ in /ɪnhamar/ [ɪnhamar] “flooded” does not undergo any phonetic change attributed to adjacency with /h/. The OT account for

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The consensus of western Mongolists to the effect that the written records of Middle Mongolian in the 5Phags-pa script, along with those in Chinese-character transcriptions, show an “intervocalic hiatus”, to be understood as a phonetic zero, in certain forms for which theUighur-Mongol script employs a velar graph, is reinvestigated on both the pragmatic (orthographic) and the structural (phonological) level, with particular reference to the probable values of the 5Phags-pa graphs for the laryngeals, studied in the light of the attested values of their Written Tibetan originals. Considerations of the complementary distribution of certain velar initials in Middle Chinese and Old Mandarin are also invoked, to clarify the use of both the Chinese characters and the 5Phags-pa script in transcribing Middle Mongolian. The investigation points in the direction of understanding these “hiatus” writings not as incorporating or representing a phonetic (or phonological) zero but instead as overt graphic representations of a voiced laryngeal or uvular spirant.

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overgeneration may be conceived of as ‘missing the point’. If we invoke the simple example of laryngeal assimilation to illustrate the argument: a rewrite rule for this pattern is easy to write in RBP, as in (6a) – this works, but it can be seen to miss the point

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Acta Linguistica Academica
Authors: Xiaoliang Luo and Guillaume Enguehard

Anderson . Amsterdam & Philadelphia : John Benjamins . 167 – 192 . Iverson , Gregory K. and Joseph C. Salmons . 1995 . Aspiration and laryngeal representation in Germanic

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. *pĕ́tĭna, pennā́rum with syncope (Vulgar *pĭ́tĭna, pĭnnā́irum with raising). Different reflex than from an old cluster *- tn -. Should the PIE root * h 2 et - ‘to wander’ have ended with a final laryngeal, we may assume proto-It. *átăno- [m.] ‘year

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nature of syllabification . Doctoral dissertation . MIT . Steriade , Donca . 1997 . Phonetics in phonology: The case of laryngeal neutralization . Manuscript (UCLA) . Szigetvári , Péter . 1999 . VC Phonology: A theory of consonant lenition and

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Laryngeal Features. MIT. Research Laboratory of Electronics Quarterly Progress Report Vol. 101, pp. 198–213. Stevens K N A Note on Laryngeal Features MIT

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