Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 32 items for :

  • "literature" x
  • Earth and Environmental Sciences x
Clear All

This paper presents a status review of the fossil remains discovered in European Russia and assigned to Stephanorhinus kirchbergensis (Jäger, 1839). Similarly to other areas, this taxon appears rare in European Russia, despite its wide distribution. Furthermore, a large part of the S. kirchbergensis material reported in literature is presently untraceable in the Russian museum collections. In fact, from a total of twenty-one sites, the material is physically available from only three of them. In addition, the remains from Podosinik, previously not mentioned in literature, are reported here. The available material has been studied using descriptive morphological characters. This study follows a previous treatment of the related sites and material from Siberian Russia by the same author. Stephanorhinus is considered here as a synonym of Dicerorhinus.

Restricted access

The results of seven new 40 Ar/ 39 Ar analyses and two K/Ar analyses of mineral separates of metamorphic rocks from the Transdanubian part (west of the Danube River) of the Tisza Mega-Unit is presented, and a review of the geochronological data available in the literature is given. Investigated rocks come from boreholes and include amphibolite facies rocks, mainly containing garnet, staurolite, kyanite, andalusite and sillimanite as index minerals. The investigated area covers 120 × 85 km in Transdanubia, including all tectonic units distinguished by previous authors. The 40 Ar/ 39 Ar spectra of the muscovites yielded fairly well-established plateau ages ranging from 307 Ma-312 Ma in all units. Similar muscovite Ar/Ar cooling ages of ca 310 Ma were obtained from other parts of Tisza Mega-unit east of the Danube, e.g. from the kyanite-sillimanite-bearing metapelites of the Villány-Bihar Subunit (Great Plain; Lelkes-Felvári et al. 2003).

Restricted access

The aim of the present summary is the spatial extension of the structural elements of the Vardar System into the inner areas of the Carpathian Basin and the evidence of its Paleogene and Neogene rejuvenations by the method of the paleogeographic reconstruction. Due to the spatial and temporal extension of the system, the concept is introduced into literature with the name of Neo-Vardar. In the present paper, its movements during the Neogene orogenic cycles, its significance in the development of the sedimentary cycles and spatial changes of the facies as well as its effects on the formation of the volcanic cycles are presented, and its determinant role in the formation of the Pannonian Basin and its sub-basins 14.5 million years ago as well as its predictive significance in the exploration of Neogene coal, hydrocarbon and ore deposits are proved.

Restricted access
Acta Geologica Hungarica
Authors: Tibor Zelenka, Endre Balázs, Kadosa Balogh, János Kiss and at. al.

Surface Neogene volcanics in Hungary are abundantly documented in the literature, but buried volcanic structures are little known. Early burial of the volcanic centers beneath latest Miocene to Pliocene sediments preserved much of their original relief, permitting their classification into genetic types. More than two-thirds of Hungary is covered by thick Neogene and Quaternary sediments, below which buried volcanic eruptive centers and the extent of their products may only be recognized by complex geologic-geophysical methods. Our study is based on the data of several thousand wells, more than 60,000 km of seismic sections, as well as airborne and surface geophysical (gravimetric, magnetic, electromagnetic, radiometric) data. Results of chemical, mineralogical studies and K/Ar dating of deep cores were also included. The data were evaluated in terms of the regional deep structure of the Carpathian-Balkan region, the Miocene evolution of which was determined by the position, movement and welding of individual microplates. Integration of all available data reveals that the Miocene volcanic centers are concentrated near microplate boundaries. In the volcanic centers the lavas and pyroclastic deposits far exceed 50 m in thickness. The data show that the buried volcanic rocks below the Transdanubian region (Little Hungarian Plain and Somogy-Baranya Hills), the Danube-Tisza Interfluve and the Great Hungarian Plain extend over a much larger area than do the outcropping volcanoes in Northern Hungary (from the Visegrád to the Tokaj Mts). In the southern part of Transdanubia (W. Hungary) a major calcalkaline, rhyolitic, ignimbritic event took place early, in Eggenburgian and Ottnangian (Early Miocene) times. The centers and tuff sheets of this volcanic event can be traced from the Mecsek Mts to the Salgótarján Basin, the southwestern Bükk Basin and the central part of the Great Hungarian Plain. This event was followed by andesitic volcanism. The rhyolite and dacite volcanic centers of Karpatian age are predominantly situated in Transdanubia, whereas the Badenian (Mid-Miocene) andesite and dacite series of large stratovolcanoes are buried below southern Transdanubia, the Danube-Tisza Interfluve and the Great Hungarian Plain. In Sarmatian and early Pannonian (Late Miocene) times, pyroclastic sheets several thousand meters thick and lava domes were formed; they are predominantly rhyolitic, subordinately andesitic and dacitic, and are situated in the eastern part of the Great Hungarian Plain (Nyírség).  With the end of microplate motion, as the plate consolidated in the late Miocene, thick but areally restricted alkali-trachite (Little Hungarian Plain) and alkali-basalt lava domes and tuff craters formed in the Little Hungarian Plain, Transdanubia and the Danube-Tisza Interfluve.

Restricted access

Csathó, P. 1994: A környezet nehézfém szennyezettsége és az agrártermelés. Tematikus szakirodalmi szemle (Heavy metal contamination of the environment and agricultural production. A thematic literature review

Restricted access

2006 Maize root biomass and net rhizo-deposited carbon: an analysis of the literature Soil Science Society of America Journal 70 1489 1503

Restricted access

) according to Mika et al. ( 2010 ) Several examples can be found in the literature for the application of the Mann–Kendall trend test, for example, Patle and Libang ( 2014 ) argued on trend analysis of annual and seasonal

Open access

in cores from boreholes or rock samples from outcrops, or estimated from literature or using the results of thermal response tests. Heat-flow density varies significantly across Europe and is usually higher in active volcanic zones with shallower

Open access

Permian felsic volcanic rocks are collectively named the Gyűrűfű Rhyolite Formation in the Hungarian lithostratigraphic literature and they form the regionally most widespread Permian formation ( Fülöp 1994 ; Császár 2005 ; Szemerédi et al. 2020

Open access

literature on quartz recrystallization (for a detailed summary, see Tullis et al. 2000 ; Passchier and Trouw 2005 ). The quartz lens displays heterogeneous deformation, with domains of different recrystallization features (Fig.  2 ). The

Open access