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Most of the contemporary scholarships of both literature and law categorize the coincidences and overlaps between an author’s literary work and his or her legal career, a given literary period and the same historical era of law and jurisprudence or between innumerable pieces of literature and the texts of the law merely as things of no real interest, curious facts that are not worthy of detailed academic analysis. While a point of view of this kind has its reasons the aim of the following paper is to change this attitude to a certain extent. In my opinion instead of talking about the “death of law and literature” we should consider the possibilites of (re)opening new ways of research for law and literature studies that may provide mutual benefits to both the representatives of legal and literary sciences. Hereinafter I will try to show why and how exploring the intertextual connections between the texts of law and those of literature seems to me the most fruitful endeavour to connect law and literature to each other.

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This paper aims to give a concise review of contemporary Hungarian researches carried out in the field of “law and literature”. It evokes the preliminaries form previous century’s in Hungarian legal philosophy, and it discusses the recent achievements by taking a closer look on the results of three subsequent symposia organized in 2006, 2008 and the previous year. In conclusion, the paper outlines the possible directions for further development of certain aspects of legal education and the critical potential of “law and literature” studies.

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Preliminary Remarks This contribution is a summary of a report analyzing available empirical research literature about student dropout from universities. The study was commissioned by The Swiss Council for Educational Research

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Anglo-American and French, as well as German, Spanish and Hungarian variations to “Law and Literature” are surveyed for that as to the nature of the discipline some conclusions can be formulated. Accordingly, “Law and Literature” recalls that which is infinite in fallibility and which is not transparent in its simplicity, that is, the situation confronted that we may not avoid deciding about despite the fact that we may not get to a final understanding. What is said thereby is that “Law and Literature” is just a life-substitute. Like an artificial ersatz, it helps one to see out from what he/she cannot surpass. What it is all about is perhaps not simply bridging the gap between the law’s proposition and the case of law, with unavoidable tensions confronting the general and the individual, as well as the abstract and the concrete. Instead, it is more about live meditation, professional methodicalness stepped back in order to gain further perspectives and renewed reflection from a distance, so that the underlying reason for the legal (and especially judicial) profession can be recurrently rethought. In a fictional form, literature is the symbol and synonym of reflected life, a field where genuine human fates can be represented. Thereby, at the same time it is a substitute for theology, rooted in earthly existence as a supply to foster feeling kinds of, or substitutes to, transcendence.

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Politics and literature traditionally developed in a close contact with each other in Hungary. This paper argues that this intimacy had a particular reason: the fact that Latin educational ideals determined the way youth were brought up well into the 20th century. This had an impact on the way politics was understood here, including the fact that parliamentary debates were carried out in Latin well into the early 19th century.And this had a further consequence as well: literature was not viewed simply as an autonomous field of activity, aiming only at aesthetic merits, but as a way to reflect on the fate of the nation. Lawyers had a professional training in rhetoric and therefore they had a familiarity with classical literature, which led many of them towards their own creative writing. And professional writers, too, had no other education than that of the Latin Christian-Humanist model, which made them representatives of the nation, as well as followers of earlier, classical patterns of writing. These features played a major role in the formation of the two heroes of the paper, the poets Dániel Berzsenyi and Ferenc Kölcsey, who had an internal conflict between each other, but who both embodied the type of late humanist political writers, so characteristic of the reform era of this region of Central Europe.

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Sichuan Province. Most migrant parents involved in this study migrated to a less developed area in Tibet. Their voices are a valuable addition to the literature that has so far focused on those going to developed cities. Comparisons between the two groups

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Introduction Volunteering has become an integral part of societies all over the world, including Central and Eastern Europe. There is a growing body of literature that recognizes the importance of volunteering ( Handy et al., 2010 ; Rothwell

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to studying in higher education. 61% of them never read literature, but only three-quarters of them read entertainment literature (most of them rarely). Twenty six percentage of them never read professional literature, and 39% read it rarely. Almost

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shadow education have become a new normal in the 2020s, and a study about private tutoring’s developing patterns may complement the existing research literature in the field. These changes in supply have also brought challenges to the conventional

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, Sheffield. 27 K. Blind, P. (2007) Building Trust in Government in the Twenty-First Century: Review of Literature and Emerging Issues . 7th Global Forum on Reinventing Government

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