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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: J. Planinić, D. Faj, B. Vuković, Z. Faj, V. Radolić and B. Suveljak

Abstract  

Although studies of radon exposure have established that Rn decay products are a cause of lung cancer among miners, the lung cancer risk to the general population from indoor radon remains unclear and controversial. Our epidemiological investigation of indoor radon influence on lung cancer incidence was carried out for 201 patients from the Osijek town. Ecological method was applied by using the town map with square fields of 1 km2 and the town was divided into 24 fields. Multiple regression study for the lung cancer rate on field, average indoor radon exposure and smoking showed a positive linear double regression for the mentioned variables. Case-control study showed that patients, diseased of lung cancer, dwelt in homes with significantly higher radon concentrations, by comparison to the average indoor radon level of control sample.

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Abstract  

222Rn concentrations were measured in 50 dwellings in Celein region, west of Al Khums city in Libya. Time-integrated passive radon dosimeters containing CR-39 detectors were used in this study. The measurements were done in living and bedrooms for each dwelling. After 3 months detectors were collected. Then, applying chemical etching to the exposed detectors, nuclear track numbers and corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. The arithmetic mean is 76.1 ± 49.4 Bq m−3 and the geometric mean is 63.8 Bq m−3 with a geometric standard deviation of 1.8. Data distribution is well fitted by a log-normal curve. The fractions of rooms where radon concentrations exceed the reference levels of 148 Bq m−3 is 7.8%. Risk of lung cancer ranges from 4 to 32 per thousand dwellers for nonsmokers and smokers respectively.

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1592 1598 R. Everatt, D. Virviciute, I. Kuzmickiene, A. Tamosiunas , Lung Cancer 85 (2014) 361–365. Tamosiunas A

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Acta Chromatographica
Authors: Su-su Bao, Jian Wen, Teng-hui Liu, Bo-wen Zhang, Chen-chen Wang and Guo-xin Hu

Introduction Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type, accounting for more than 80% of all lung cancers [ 1 , 2 ]. NSCLC includes squamous cell

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Acta Chromatographica
Authors: Samiuela Lee, Christa E. Nath, Ben W. R. Balzer, Craig R. Lewis, Toby N. Trahair, Antoinette C. Anazodo and Peter J. Shaw

is effective in the treatment of patients with advanced ALK-positive tumors, including non-small-cell lung cancers and lymphomas. This drug is also effective in patients with central nervous system disease [ 1 , 2 ]. In a phase 1/2 study, dose

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Abstract  

Lung cancer and smoking are associated. Epidemiological studies show that not only lung cancer but other chest diseases have causative relationship with smoking. Cigarette tobacco and smoke contains many carcinogens. Inorganic and metallic constituents of cigarette tobacco and smoke have not been studied as extensively as the organic compounds. Since some of the metals are highly toxic and also carcinogenic, authors have attempted to measure the levels of some of the trace elements of Indian tobacco by instrumental neutron activation analysis, and compared the results with the tobacco of America, Germany, Iran and New Zealand.

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Abstract  

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year may be related to radon exposure. This paper briefly describes the approach used to derive the Agency's central estimate of risk to the population. The weight-of-evidence for classifying radon as a known human carcinogen and the uncertainties associated with estimating risks from radon exposure provide an important context for these estimates and are briefly discussed.

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Abstract  

The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium Use Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact252Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with252Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of252Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a252Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded252Cf sources for tumors therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

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Abstract  

Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues, including octreotate have been used for targeted radiotherapy of neuroendocrine tumors such as lymphoma, breast cancer, small-cell lung cancer and melanoma. In this paper, studies on the optimization of the production of 177Lu, 166Ho and 153Sm radionuclides in Pakistan Atomic Research Reactor (PARR-I) and the investigations on the labeling of DOTA-Tyr-3 Octreotate with 131I, 177Lu, 166Ho and 153Sm have been reported. The labeled DOTA-Tyr3-Octreotate complexes were found to be stable in acetate/ascorbate buffer and saline at room temperature (18–22°C). The biodistribution studies of 177Lu-DOTA-Tyr-3 Octreotate in rat model indicated that the critical organ for this complex was the pancreas and the excretion route was through kidney.

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Abstract  

Tumors such as prostate, small cell lung cancer, breast, gastric and colon cancer are known to overexpress receptors to bombesin (BBN). In this study, a new bombesin analogue was labeled with 99mTc via HYNIC and tricine/EDDA as coligands and investigated further. HYNIC-GABA-Bombesin (7–14) NH2 was synthesized using a standard Fmoc strategy. Labeling with 99mTc was performed at 100 °C for 10 min and radiochemical analysis involved ITLC and HPLC methods. The stability of radiopeptide was checked in the presence of humane serum at 37 °C up to 24 h. The receptor bound internalization and externalization rates were studied in GRP receptor expressing PC-3 cells. Biodistribution of radiopeptide was studied in nude mice bearing PC-3 tumor. Labeling yield of >98% was obtained corresponding to a specific activity of ~2.6 MBq/nmol. Peptide conjugate showed good stability in the presence of human serum. The radioligand showed high and specific internalization into PC-3 cells (14.63 ± 0.41% at 4 h). In biodistribution studies, a receptor-specific uptake was observed in GRP-receptor-positive organs so that after 4 h the uptakes in mouse tumor and pancreas were 1.31 ± 0.18 and 1.2 ± 0.13% ID/g, respectively.

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