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This paper explores how Ingoma, a dance of the Ngoni of Malawi can be described as an identity marker and a cultural text of the Ngoni. The Ngoni constitute one of the nine major ethnic groups of Malawi. Unlike the other eight ethnic groups, however, the Ngonido do not have a language with which they are identified and use for everyday communication. This is largely due to socio-cultural and political influences that they experienced in the areas they settled. Notwithstanding this aspect of their identity, their dance Ingoma has stood the test of time and continues to be transmitted from one generation to another. Since language is key to the transmission of dance, the paper also examines the implications of transmitting dance in other people’s language. The paper focuses on three main groups of the Ngoni, namely, the M’mbelwaJere found in the north, the MpezeniJere found in the west and the GomaniMaseko in the centre. The Ingoma performances by groups from each of these areas were investigated.

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, Johan – Folke , Carl (eds) Navigating Social-Ecological Systems. Building Resilience for Complexity and Change , 1 – 29 . New York : Cambridge University Press . Berkes , Fikret – Turner , Nancy J. 2006 Coming to Understanding

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. Ecological Applications 10 : 1251 – 1262 . Berkes , Fikret – Colding , Johan – Folke , Carl 2003 Introduction . In Berkes , Fikret – Colding , Johan – Folke , Carl (eds) Navigating Social-Ecological Systems. Building Resilience for

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. P eters , R obin – Z immermann , A ndreas 2017 Resilience and Cyclicity: Towards a macrohistory of the Central European Neolithic . Quaternary International 446 , 43 – 53

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. Wallingford : CAB International . Hartel , Tibor – Craioveanu , Cristina – Réti , Kinga Olga 2016 Tree Hay as Source of Economic Resilience in Traditional Social-Ecological Systems from Transylvania . Martor 21 : 53 – 64 . Hegyi , Imre

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Abstract  

After having been systematically disfigured by building developers for decades, in the last 15 years Naples has been over-polluted and unable to manage the problem of waste dumping sites. The latest and most blatant outcome of this situation is the world-infamous image of a beautiful and ancient city literally swallowed by its own trash. But behind this shocking TV-picture lies a structural condition in which ecological devastation, politics and business are tightly interlaced. Environmental ruin is here in fact just another face of a deeper political failure, which can be labeled a crisis of citizenship, also caused by the rise of the so-called “ecomafia.” This essay questions whether and how ecological culture and ecocriticism in particular can provide the population with critical instruments necessary to develop their own “strategy of survival” both environmental and political. After reflecting on the philosophical implications of the idea of waste, it considers whether projects of environmental education based on narrations about territorial issues can be implemented as forms of a “narrative re-inhabitation”: a task intended to sharpen people’s ecological and political awareness starting from their “locatedness,” to restore social hope and to envision long-term community projects. In this framework, the eco-cultural retrieval and invention of locally embedded stories and of place-identity is both an expression of civil disobedience toward a corrupted power and a means of political resilience.

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828 833 Sendzimir, J. et al. (2008) Assessing the Resilience Of a River Management Regime: Informal Learning in a Shadow Network in the Tisza River Basin. Ecology and Society

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