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In his essay, Mr. Gerfaud focuses on the relationship between resistence ( résistance) and conformity (convenance) as they are represented through the attitudes of the play's protagonists. He also suggests a special interpreation of these two notions on the basis of the texts.

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The words convenance "convenience" and résistance " resistence" are not a prioriin a relation of opposition. However, as their form is similar and their meaning is opposite, they may be conceived by linguistic awareness as antonyms. In his essay Mr Tourrel attempts to reveal whether there is semantic opposition between the words. Proceeding from a lexicographic definition illustrated by examples, he examines wether the two words can be adjusted to the same semantic axis, wether they are in a relation of logical presupposition, and wether they are of opposite semantic value.

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All the actors in Octavia, a pseudo-Senecan drama, are afraid of something. Only the Roman people are capable of overcoming their fears and of supporting the emperor's rejected wife and this eventually leads to their fall. Octavia, who enjoys the people's sympathy, nonetheless remains passive. Her passivity can be interpreted as a form of resistance through inactivity - she considers this the only means of preventing the impending marriage between Nero and Poppea.

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Magyarországon a XIX. század közepétől 1956-ig 1996 Nagy Varga , Vera 1995: Alkalmazkodás és szembenállás: volt kulákok egy mezővárosban [Accommodation and resistance: former kulaks of a market-town]. In

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Since seizing power in 1949, China’s Communist Party has exerted firm control over all aspects of cultural expression. This policy took its most radical turn in the mid-1960s when Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution (1966–1976), aiming to rid the country of bourgeois elements. The composer Zhao Jiping was a student at the Xi’an Conservatory during this period. He graduated in 1970, but was able to continue his studies only when the Central Conservatory reopened in 1978. On completing his studies, he established himself as a composer of folk-inspired music for film and the concert stage. This paper focuses on Zhao’s score for director Zhang Yimou’s Red Sorghum (Hong gao liang, 1987), a film based on the 1986 novel by 2012 Nobel laureate Mo Yan. While the composer enjoyed only limited recognition beyond China, he went on to score other successful films, among them Raise the Red Lantern (1991) and Farewell, My Concubine (1993), and achieve success as a composer of concert music. The paper connects Zhao’s musical language to the impact of the Cultural Revolution by examining how in Red Sorghum his music was employed to evoke a virile image of rural China.

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This article defines convenience in foreign language teaching as a neces­sity to adapt teaching process to students' needs and expectations. On the basis of their teaching experience with Chinese learners, Ms Charmet and Ms Martin present a thorough error analysis and thus propose a method which is conform to Chinese way of thinking as well as to Chinese learning habits: amusing activities which lead students from repetition drills to a reflective and creative language use, with special attention to phonological difficulties.

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The efforts of the communist regime, following the Revolution of 1956, to channel discussion of the events of the Revolution into a simplistic ideological opposition exerted (and arguably continue to exert) a powerful influence on political discourse in Hungary, in spite of numerous challenges issued against the validity of this opposition by historians and political scientists. It is possible that literature may offer new perspectives from which the terms that have exercised such a constrictive influence on this discourse can be reevaluated. This discussion of works of poetry by French, German, and American poets on the events of 1956 in Hungary examines the ways in which not only these events, but also the terms in which they were cast were perceived and thrown into question by writers living outside Hungary, several of whom also wrote influential essays on politics. Moreover, it considers how literary theory, specifically because it makes language and the creation of meaning the object of its inquiry, provides critical strategies through which the terms of this discourse can be deconstructed and deflated, creating opportunities for new (re)constructions of our understanding of these events.

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The paper aims to look at those community-organizing phenomena that provided alternatives to officially supported, mandatory youth activities and played a vital role in the everyday life of young people in socialist Hungary in the 1970s and 80s. The urban folk dance and music revival, the so-called táncház (dance house) movement, is highlighted. The authors argue that the dance house as a subculture with its concept of “authenticity” was able to create common identity with the intrinsic notion of oppositional stance. Parallels are drawn between sports, rock music, literature and the dance house. The process of disintegration and folkloristic discovery of traditional peasant culture in Hungary and in Transylvania, communist peasant policy, and the connections between cities and villages are discussed alongside the phenomena of revival and issues of identity.

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