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. C., Khan, M. R.: Characterization and screening of bacteria from rhizosphere of rice grown in acidic soils of Assam. Curr. Sci. 86 , 978–985 (2004). Khan M. R. Characterization

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-fixing Pseudomonas strain promoting rice growth. Biol. Fertil. Soils 43 , 163–170 (2006). Malik K. A. Molecular characterization and PCR detection of a nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas strain

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Sándor Szekeres, Alexandra Juhász, Milán Kondor, Nóra Takács, László Sugár, and Sándor Hornok

Reports of Sarcocystis rileyi-like protozoa (‘rice breast disease’) from anseriform birds had been rare in Europe until the last two decades, when S. rileyi was identified in northern Europe and the UK. However, despite the economic losses resulting from S. rileyi infection, no recent accounts are available on its presence (which can be suspected) in most parts of central, western, southern and eastern Europe. Between 2014 and 2019, twelve mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were observed to have rice breast disease in Hungary, and the last one of these 12 cases allowed molecular identification of S. rileyi, as reported here. In addition, S. rileyi was molecularly identified in the faeces of one red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The hunting season for mallards in Hungary lasts from mid-August to January, which in Europe coincides with the wintering migration of anseriform birds towards the south. Based on this, as well as bird ringing data, it is reasonable to suppose that the first S. rileyi-infected mallards arrived in Hungary from the north. on the other hand, red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), which are final hosts of S. rileyi, are ubiquitous in Hungary, and our molecular finding confirms an already established autochthonous life cycle of S. rileyi in the region. Taken together, this is the first evidence for the occurrence of S. rileyi in Hungary and its region.

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. : A waterborne tularemia outbreak . Eur J Epidemiol 3 , 35 – 38 ( 1987 ). 10.1007/BF00145070 8. Rice , E. W. : Occurrence and control of tularemia in

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rice and their antipathogenic activities in vitro. World J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 20 , 303–309 (2004). Zhou S. N. Study on the communities of endophytic fungi and endophytic

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Costa P, Beernaerts A: Benign tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract (stomach, duodenum, small bowel). Acta Chir Belg 1993; 93: 39 6 Rice DC, Bakaeen F, Farley

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Alexandra Juhász, Ádám Dán, Béla Dénes, István Kucsera, József Danka, and Gábor Majoros

Bearup, A. J., Langsford, W. A.: Schistosome dermatitis in association with rice growing in the northern territory of Australia. Medic. J. Aust., 1966, 1 (13), 521–525. 22

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történő finanszírozásának részletes szabályairól.] Available from: http://net.jogtar.hu [Hungarian] 8 Rice N, Smith PC. Strategic resource allocation and funding decisions

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Marcell Szabó, Anna Bozó, Sándor Soós, Katalin Darvas, László Harsányi, and Ákos Csomós

Care Med., 2012, 38 (12), 1930–1945. 4 Hollenbeck, B. L., Rice, L. B.: Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus. Virulence, 2012, 3 (5

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Hungarian Medical Journal
Authors: Imre Gerlinger, Péter Bakó, Krisztina Somogyvári, Péter Móricz, and József Pytel

2003 113 853 858 Blayney, A. W., Williams, K. R., Rice, H. J.: A dynamic and harmonic damped finite

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