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; Voeltzel 2016 ; Mutlu 2020 ). Given the possibility that the controller and the controllee are in a c++command but not c-command relation, see (A6c) and (D1), a head may be controlled from within an embedded OP (12). In the case of a simplex (12a) or upper

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geminated. I conclude with Raz (1980 ; 1983) that underlying geminate glides surface as simplex. 2.2 The frameworks adopted In their analysis of the assimilation data, Lowenstamm and Prunet (1988) provide an account of the vocalic system in the

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perspective, are parsed as coda–onset sequences word-internally, as coda clusters word-finally and as simplex onset preceded by an extrasyllabic segment word-initially. However, the different parses are obtained in order to obey those syllabification

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registres 4 et 5. Réalisation orale polie limitant les compromis avec la phonétique naturelle. Registre 2. – Latin en stylus simplex comprenant des séquences de protofrançais masqué : préambules des capitulaires ; corps des lettres dans les correspondances

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dieselben drei Felder, Stilmittel, lexikalische Struktur und Akustik in seiner Institutio immer noch im Blick: Beim Griechen Lysias erkennt er eine sprachliche gratia , die einem simplex atque inadfectatus color entspringt (9. 4. 17); für die akustische

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consonants and vowels, or at least there is a considerable overlap between the two sets. Second, they claim that all primes are unary/monovalent/privative, which receive direct phonetic interpretation in both simplex and complex phonological expressions

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This article presents a new theory of simplex numerals that incorporates a slight revision of Chomsky’s (2008) set-theoretic conception of natural number, which assumes that the notion of natural number is innate. The new theory makes it possible to account for the behavior of numerals in counting as well as the developmental stages that children go through in learning numerals. The key idea is that set-theoretic objects corresponding to natural number notions are subject to operations that apply when a syntactic object is converted to phonological form. These operations provide a crucial link that connects the meaning of a numeral with the count list consisting of numerals. A notable feature of the proposed analysis is that the Cardinal Principle is derived by recruiting linguistic computation and therefore is no longer stipulated as such.

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In this paper we look at the demise of perfective reduplication in Latin and seek to answer the question why this process of erosion followed a phonologically rather strictly defined path. The small set of remaining reduplicated perfects is not a random collection of leftovers from the ruins of earlier morphology (as it is e.g. in Gothic) but displays remarkable phonological coherence in the documented period of the language. To understand why this should be so we look at the relevant phonotactic properties of simplex forms. It appears quite clearly that, for a variety of reasons, the number of stems beginning with p V p , t V t , k V k , b V b and s V s increased in the prehistory of Latin. The fact that this occurred and that voiceless stops figure more prominently in this configuration than other types of consonants may well have given rise to a new phonotactic pattern in which such stem-initial sequences were now legitimate (as opposed to Proto-Indo-European). It seems to be a plausible explanation that perfective verb forms remained reduplicated only if they conformed to this new phonotactic pattern.

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