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Main aim of this paper is to illustrate the experimental partial results of a study on various exterior wall fragments. The study was performed for selected wall fragments and time periods, with attention focused also on wall orientation (East and South) with identical layering and also on dynamic thermal parameters connected to the thermal comfort during summer and winter. Evaluation is done for real measured climate conditions in the area of experimental laboratory (exterior – University of Zilina) and interior conditions set according to the Slovak standard. For needs of the long-term experiment (since March 2017), temperature and relative humidity between layers are monitored. This paper deals specifically with the temperature measurement of selected days. For future publications also coupled heat-air-moisture transport analysis is intended. In this part of analysis, some extreme boundary conditions were selected and reviewed from the point of view of measured temperature inside the wall. Temperature peaks are characterized with respect to exposure to real atmospheric conditions.

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Abstract

Lili Ország visited Italy five times between 1968 and 1972. During her travels she prepared numerous sketches and drawings, which are now held at the Archives of the Hungarian National Gallery. The six sketchbooks filled during her trips to Italy are dominated by registration of the Pompeii, Herculaneum and Naples experiences, nevertheless there are pages drawn full in Rome as well. So far art history literature has only briefly touched upon these sketchbooks. The present essay, through examples of those pages where the subject of sketches has been clearly identified, intends to analyse methods of picture construction and composition in the art of Lili Ország, and also to underline the importance of Italian, especially Pompeian experience in her works.

Preponderant majority of sketches — drawn with pencil, ball-point pen or marker as aide memoires — delineate painted walls of Pompeii, yet antique sculptures, some mosaics, and as an exception to the rule a few panel paintings and papyrus scrolls also come up in the sketchbooks. Latter also serve as specific examples for borrowing motifs.

Figural scenes among Pompeian frescoes hardly fascinated Lili Ország, it was rather the system of decorative wall-panes, their colours, the changing rythm of patches (that is the third Pompeian style), and also illusionistic architectural spaces (the second style) that made her trace them religiously. In her sketches she paid attention to exact representation of proportions and composition, the expressiveness of her outlines is exceptional. She registered colours in detail, using denominations that evoque material consistence. She precisely traced all injuries of walls, including abrasion, cracks or patches of mortar. She felt only those motifs (be human figures or objects) worth of treasuring for later use, that had an air of bizarre or peculiar. She loved pictures and sculptures with mystical influences, she was interested in instruments that could reach the desirable effect (worn down green walls, fragmented stuccoes).

The majority of sculptures drawn can be characterized by abundant drapery hiding the forms of human body. Representation of human figures in general can be marked by the lack of sensual visualisation, faces are scarcely ever individualised. Expressive power of figures, their emotions, states of mind are transmitted by postures and gestures.

While she had already lit on the basic elements of her paintings well before her Italian travels, the Pompeian experience was key to further development of her composing methods. This impulse unequivocally contributed to the creation of the Labyrinth-series. The division of the wall surface into smaller units, the lapsing system of picture panes, the rythm of coulorful, often pale patches served as essential sources of inspiration.

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Eberhard, S., Doubrava, N., Marfa, V., Mohnen, D., Southwick, A., Darvil, A. I. and Albersheim, P. (1989): Pectic cell wall fragments regulate tobacco thin-cell-layer explant morphogenesis. — Plant Cell 1 : 747

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innate immune protein Nod2 binds directly to MDP, a bacterial cell wall fragment . J Am Chem Soc 134 , 13535 – 13537 ( 2012 ) 8. Guerry P

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, the forms of foot or wall fragments with glaze on the inside remain unclear (17 pieces). Mortarium: a vessel typical for Roman culinary culture. Its grit-roughened interior made it suitable for grinding spices and making sauces during the first three

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tempered with lime and small pebbles, and a smooth surface with vertical stripes. These vessels are thick-walled, burnt, dark-grey in colour on the inside and light brown outside. No wall fragments have been found from this type of pottery; therefore their

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) 23. Grimes CL , Ariyananda Lde Z , Melnyk JE , O’Shea EK : The innate immune protein Nod2 binds directly to MDP, a bacterial cell wall fragment . J Am Chem Soc 134

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found in the sanctuary. Based on the manuscript of K. Herepei, M. Takács mentioned also ceramic material, bones and painted wall fragments. Bibliography: Takács 1987 ; Rusu-Pescaru – Alicu , 2000 , 78; Sicoe 2014, 168 , cat. nos 59–61 with further

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foot. The rim is everted, there is a rib on the neck, the shoulder, and the belly are separated by a sharp carination. The bottom is omphalos-shaped. M.d.=13 cm, B.d.=3 cm, H.=15 cm. ( Fig. 15.10 and Fig. 31.6 ) Several wall fragments of vessels were

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