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element content of greater celandine ( Chelidonium majus L.). Acta Alimentaria , 34 , 113–120. Szentmihályi K. Mineral element content of greater celandine (Chelidonium

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A Chelidonium majus L. quaternary alkaloid fraction has been used as a model mixture to investigate the effect of the procedure used on the preparative separation of its components. The steps optimized wereThe mode of application of the starting band to the layerThe effect on the separation of the bands of the number of developments in unidimensional multiple development (UMD)The effect of concentration overloading on the separation of the bands; andThe effect of the volume of solution introduced to the adsorbent layer on the resolution of neighboring bands.

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celandine (Chelidonium majus L) . J. Chromat. A , 889 , 69-74. Effect of sample handling on alkaloid and mineral content of aqueous extracts of greater celandine (Chelidonium majus L) . J. Chromat

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We present a new simple thin-layer chromatographic method designed for determination of the main alkaloids of Chelidonium majus L. In this study, we used roots and herb of the plant collected in spring and autumn. The alkaloid fractions were prepared according to modified pharmacopeial procedure [1].

In our method, we performed two-step elution onto silica gel plates. The first eluent consisted of chloroform, methanol, and water mixed with 70:30:4 proportion. The second eluent comprised of toluene, ethyl acetate, and methanol with 83:15:2 proportion. The described thin-layer chromatography (TLC) system allows qualitative and quantitative determination of the following alkaloids: sanguinarine, chelerythrine, chelidonine, coptisine, and berberine. For determination of protopine, eluent with n-buthanol, acetic acid, and water in 15:1.5:4 proportion was investigated.

The dominant alkaloids observed in studied fractions were coptisine (1027.096 ± 13.367–287.474 ± 3.069 mg/100 g dry matter ± sdv) and chelidonine (1780.667 ± 263.522– 115.929 ± 14.694 mg/100 g dry matter ± sdv). The alkaloid detected in the least amount was chelerythrine (30.74 ± 7.526–1.143 ± 0.0651 mg/100 g dry matter ± sdv). The highest total amount of all alkaloids was determined in the fractions obtained from herbs in spring, and the lowest amount was detected in herbs autumn.

Additionally, we compared amounts of studied alkaloids in different parts of plants (aerial parts and roots). The plants were collected in spring and autumn.

Authors concluded that the presented method can be used as a valuable tool for screening studies on C. majus L.

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The greater celandine ( Chelidonium majus L.), a well-known source of isoquinoline alkaloids, has a long history of use as a medicinal plant. Although the antimicrobial activity of Chelidonium alkaloids against pathogenic bacteria has been reported, the mechanism of this action is almost unknown. The BioArena system, which integrates the modern method and biological results of bioautography with TLC and/or OPLC, is especially suitable for investigating biochemical interactions in the adsorbent layer after chromatographic separation. The antimicrobial effect of alkaloids obtained from Chelidonium root has been demonstrated by use of this system. It was assumed that the antibiotic activity of chelidonium alkaloids was a result of formation of formaldehyde. It was also assumed that addition of endogenous HCHO-capture molecules, for example l -arginine and glutathione, to the culture medium reduces the antibacterial activity of Chelidonium alkaloids whereas Cu(II) ions enhance the effect. The results obtained support these assumptions and our earlier observations that HCHO and its reaction products are very important in the antibiotic action of these compounds. These small molecules (l -arginine and glutathione) can capture HCHO molecules mobilized by alkaloids and possibly by pathogen cells, and may be responsible for reduced antibacterial effect. The HCHO-mobilizing power of Cu(II) ions dramatically enhanced the antibiotic effect. The BioArena system is highly suitable for studying special interactions in the adsorbent layer.

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Extracts of tertiary and quaternary alkaloids from Chelidonium majus L. have been separated by OPLC. Samples of different volumes were developed on SiO 2 layers in a BS-50 Personal OPLC chamber using different mobile-phase velocities from 100 to 400 µL min −1 . The effect of mobile-phase velocity in OPLC on properties such as retardation factors, reproducibility, efficiency, number of theoretical plate, HETP , and resolution, was investigated.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Gabriella Kazinczi, Joseph Horváth, Adrás Takács, Imre Béres, Richard Gáborjányi, and Miklós Nádasy

130 Matos, O.C., Baeta, J., Silva, M.J. and Ricardo, C.P. (1999): Sensitivity of Fusarium strains to Chelidonium majus L. extracts. J. Ethnopharmacology 66, 151

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/2010 Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC) ( 2011 b): Public statement on Chelidonium majus L., herba. – EMA/HMPC/743927/2010 Dhami , N. and Mishra , A. D. ( 2015 ): Phytochemical

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Dragana Jakovljević, Sava Vasić, Milan Stanković, Ljiljana Čomić, and Marina Topuzović

. Jakovljević , D. , Stanković , M. S. , Topuzović , M. ( 2013 ) Seasonal variability of Chelidonium majus L. secondary metabolites content and antioxidant activity . EXCLI J. 12 , 260 – 268 . 8

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Oana Roşca-Casian, Cristina Mircea, Laurian Vlase, Ana-Maria Gheldiu, Delia Tania Teuca, and Marcel Pârvu

-Casian , O. , Bartha , C. , Barbu-Tudoran , L. , Pârvu , A. E. ( 2013 ) Chemical composition of celandine ( Chelidonium majus L.) extract and its effects on Botrytis tulipae (Lib.) Lind fungus and the tulip . Not. Bot. Hort. Agrobot. Cluj

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