Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • " F. sporotrichioides " x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Enniatins (ENs), produced by Fusarium species are a group of mycotoxins with antimicrobial, insecticidal (GROVE & POPLE, 1980) and phytotoxic activities. PCR based assays were applied for detecting enniatin-producing strains of Fusarium avenaceum, F. poae and F. sporotrichioides isolated from wheat seeds originated of 30 geographic localities of Hungary. All F. sporotrichoides strains and except two of all F. poae strains gave positive signal to esysp1 and esysp2 primers as well as all F. avenaceum isolates were positive to esya1 and esya2 primers indicating the ability to produce ENs. This is a first report of the enniatin producing ability of Fusarium species associated to wheat in Hungary.

Restricted access

The species-specific PCR assays correctly identified pure cultures of Fusarium acuminatum (3 isolates), F. avenaceum (22 isolates), F. poae (13 isolates), and F. sporotrichioides (6 isolates) originated from Hungarian wheat grain.The PCR-based assays described in this study can be used for the routine detection and identification of above-mentioned Fusaria without morphological determination.

Restricted access
Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica
Authors: M. I. Kiseleva, A. V. Ovsyankina, T. M. Kolomiets, N. S. Zhemchuzhina, and A. P. Glinushkin

Since 1995 the pathogens of genus Fusarium causing Root Rot, Snow Mold, Fusarium Head Blight of grain crops have been monitored in the Volga-Vyatka, Central, Central Chernozem and North Caucasian regions of the Russian Federation and in there were identified 15 Fusarium spp.: F. culmorum, F. heterosporum, F. sporotrichioides, F. oxysporum, F. nivale, F. graminearum, F. avenacеum, F. gibbosum, F. sambucinum, F. moniliforme, F. semitectum, F. poae, F. lateritium, F. solani, F. redolens. The high uniformity of Fusarium spp. has been revealed for the regions due to the susceptibility of crops to the soil-inhabiting micromycetes. Consistent long-term monitoring of the dynamics and frequency of occurrence of Fusarium spp. in a wide range of climatic areas has made it possible to characterize the state of the species of fungi in the regions and also to study their intraspecific and interspecific variability in toxicity and pathogenicity depended on biotic and abiotic factors. The prevalence of Fusarium spp. in the mycobiota has been determined by their plasticity and viability in the soil, on the weed roots and in the stubble of many crops and high competitive ability expressed pathogenicity and toxicity.

Restricted access

Experiments conducted at the Lithuanian Institute of Agriculture in 2004–2005 were designed to investigate the contamination of winter rye cv. ‘Duoniai’ and triticale cv. ‘Tornado’ grain with fungi of genus Fusarium and mycotoxins produced by them as affected by the spray-applications of the crops with the fungicides propiconazole, tebuconazole, and azoxystrobin at the beginning of anthesis (BBCH 63). Having analysed winter rye and triticale grain samples for Fusarium species composition ( Fusarium avenaceum (Fr.) Sacc, F. sporotrichioides Sherb., F. poae (Peck) Wollenw, F. culmorum (W. G. Sm.) Sacc., F. graminearum Schwabe, F. solani (Mart.) Sacc., F. incarnatum (Desm.) Sacc . F. sambucinum Fuckel) were identified in rye grain — ( F. culmorum (W. G. Sm.) Sacc., F. poae (Peck) Wollenw., F. heterosporum Nees) — in triticale grain. The grain samples from winter rye plots sprayed with azoxystrobin were the most heavily affected by Fusarium (42.5%) and the highest contents of DON (691 μg kg −1 ) and T-2 toxin (153.6 μg kg −1 ) were identified in them. Tebuconazole reduced the amount of Fusarium -affected grain in rye and triticale, but did not have any effect on mycotoxin production in rye. The grain of triticale not sprayed with fungicides was more heavily contaminated with DON (427 μg kg −1 ).

Restricted access

This article focuses on the occurrence of Fusarium species on barley kernels in Slovakia. The study was conducted over two consecutive crop years (2004–2005) on three cultivars (potential malting varieties) at five locations in Slovakia. Fusarium spp. were detected in all locations and years ranging from 0.1 to 27% seed infestation. The highest infestation of kernels was recorded in 2005 for all localities and all cultivars. The following species were detected: Fusarium acuminatum, F. arthrosporioides, F. avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. chlamydosporum, F. equiseti, F. graminearum, F. langsethiae, F. nivale (syn. Microdochium nivale ), F. oxysporum, F. poae, F. sambucinum, F. semitectum, F. solani, F. sporotrichioides , and F. tricinctum . The most common was F. poae in all localities and cultivars, with an isolation frequency ranging from 0.33 to 11.67%. This is the first report of F. langsethiae occurrence in Slovakia with an isolation frequency ranging from 0.33 to 6.67%. In 2005 a wider spectrum of Fusarium species, a higher level of kernel infestation, and a lower germinative activity was recorded than in 2004. The germinative activity of kernels was impaired the most in 2005 irrespective of cultivar. The decreasing of germinative activity in 2005 corresponded with higher kernel infestation with Fusarium fungi.

Restricted access

. Phylogenetic relationship of Fusarium langsethiae to F. poae and F. sporotrichioides as inferred by IGS, ITS, ß-tubulin sequences and UP-PCR hybridization analysis. Inter. J. Food Microbiol. 95 :267–285. Klemsdal

Restricted access

Fusarium poae, F. graminearum, F. sporotrichioides and F. langsethiae in cereal grains in Finland and Russia Archives of Phytopathol. and Plant Protection 2008 41

Restricted access

. crookwellense , F. equiseti and F. sporotrichioides are isolated frequently from infected heads. In addition, the number of Fusarium species associated with FHB varies between countries as well as years ( Parry et al., 1995 ; Xue et al., 2006

Restricted access