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Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) varieties grown in Central (Molise) and Southern Italy (Basilicata and Calabria). Fagopyrum , 23 , 83–90. Mandarino P. Yield assessment of twenty

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, M., Gaberšcik, A., Kreft, I. 2005. Combined effects of elevated UV-B radiation and the addition of selenium on common ( Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) and tartary ( Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn.) buckwheat. Photosyntetica 43 :583

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The use of buckwheat as a source of rutin for medicine or food supplement requires a high content of this component in pimary row materials. The study was aimed at the investigation of the influence of stand density and sowing dates on the rutin content in the aboveground parts at the stage of flowering and achenes of two buckwheat species (Fagopyrum esculentum and Fagopyrum tataricum). The rutin content in the aboveground parts of buckwheat was significantly higher in plants sown in mid-May. The sowing date did not influence the rutin content in the achenes. The whole buckwheat plant contained the highest content of rutin in 25 cm rows with a sowing ratio of 200 achenes per square metre. However, the final rutin amount obtained from a buckwheat stand depended on the production of biomass. Common buckwheat provided a higher rutin yield because it produced a higher amount of biomass of inflorescences, the part rich in this flavonoid. Therefore 12.5 cm rows with 400 seeds per square metre are suitable for rutin production because of the higher number of plants. We can recommend tartary buckwheat for achene production as a source of rutin for human nutrition or food supplement because it provides twenty-fivefold more rutin than common buckwheat.

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The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of endophytic fungi from tartary buckwheat on the host sprout growth and functional metabolite production. Without obvious changes in the appearance of the sprouts, the exogenous fungal mycelia elicitors notably stimulated the sprout growth and rutin accumulation, and the stimulation effect was mainly depended on the mycelia elicitor species along with its treatment dose. Three endophytic fungi Fat6 (Bionectria pityrodes), Fat9 (Fusarium oxysporum) and Fat15 (Alternaria sp.) were screened to be the most effective candidates for promoting F. tataricum sprout growth and rutin production. With application of polysaccharide (PS, 150 mg/l) of endophyte Fat6, PS (200 mg/l) of endophyte Fat9, and PS (150 mg/l) of endophyte Fat15, the rutin yield was effectively increased to 47.89 mg/(100 sprouts), 45.85 mg/(100 sprouts) and 46.83 mg/(100 sprouts), respectively. That was about 1.5- to 1.6-fold compared to the control culture of 29.37 mg/(100 sprouts). Furthermore, the present study revealed that the biosynthesis of the functional flavonoid resulted from the stimulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway by mycelia polysaccharide treatments. Application of specific fungal elicitors could be an efficient strategy for improving the nutritional and functional quality of tartary buckwheat sprouts.

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This study was to examine the effects of four fungal polysaccharides, namely exo-polysaccharide (EPS), water-extracted mycelia polysaccharide (WPS), sodium hydroxideextracted mycelia polysaccharide (SPS), and hydrochloric-extracted mycelia polysaccharide (APS) obtained from the endophytic fungus Bionectra pityrodes Fat6, on the sprout growth and flavonoids production of Fagopyrum tataricum. Without obvious changes in the appearance of the sprouts, the exogenous polysaccharide elicitors notably stimulated the sprout growth and functional metabolites accumulation, and the stimulation effect was mainly depended on the polysaccharide species along with its treatment dose. With application of 150 mg/l of EPS, 150 mg/l of WPS and 200 mg/l of SPS, the total rutin and quercetin yield of buckwheat sprouts was effectively increased to 49.18 mg/(100 sprouts), 50.54 mg/(100 sprouts), and 52.27 mg/(100 sprouts), respectively. That was about 1.57- to 1.66-fold in comparison with the control culture of 31.40 mg/(100 sprouts). Moreover, the present study revealed the accumulation of bioactive flavonoids resulted from the stimulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway by fungal polysaccharide treatments. It could be an efficient strategy for improving the nutritional and functional quality of tartary buckwheat sprouts applied with specific fungal elicitors.

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4384 4387 Fabjan, N., Rode J., Kosir, I.J., Wang, Z.H., Zhang, Z., Kreft, I., 2003: Tartary buckwheat ( Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) as a source of dietary rutin and

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: M. Stéger-Máté, G. Ficzek, E. Kállay, G. Bujdosó, J. Barta, and M. Tóth

esculentum Moench. and Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) varieties grown in southern Italy. Acta agron. Hung ., 55 (3), 26–31. Végvári G. Rutin content of the grain of buckwheat

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Henryk Dębski, Magdalena Szwed, WiesŁaw Wiczkowski, Dorota Szawara-Nowak, Natalia Bączek, and Marcin Horbowicz

anthocyanin under UV and non-UV conditions in Tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn) . Plant Prod. Sci. 12 , 150 – 155 . 8. Eichholz , I. , Rohn , S. , Gamm , A

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Park, B.J., Park, J.I., Chang, K.J., Park, Ch.H. 2004. Comparison in rutin content in seed and plant of tartary buckwheat ( Fagopyrum tataricum ). Proceedings of the 9 th International Symposium on Buckwheat, VURV, Praha, pp. 626

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: J. Bystrická, A. Vollmannová, A. Kupecsek, J. Musilová, Z. Poláková, I. Čičová, and T. Bojňanská

4384 4387 Fabjan, N., Rode, J., Kosir, I.J., Zhang, Z., Kreft, I. 2003. Tartary buckwheat ( Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn.) as a source of dietary rutin and quercetin. J. of

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