Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • " Zingiber officinale " x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

An efficient, sensitive, and precise high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method has been established for analysis of 6-gingerol in marketed Ayurvedic formulations and in the rhizomes of different varieties of Zingiber officinale . HPTLC separation was performed on aluminum foil-backed HPTLC plates coated with 0.2-mm layers of silica gel 60 F 254 , with n -hexane-acetone, 7.2:2.8 ( v/v ) as mobile phase. Plates were developed to a distance of 78 mm at 20 ± 4°C in a chamber previously saturated for 4 min. Under these condition the retention factor ( R F ) of 6-gingerol was 0.23 and the compound was quantified at 286 nm, its wavelength of maximum absorbance. The limits of detection and quantification were 40 and 150 ng per band, respectively. Response to 6-gingerol was a linear function of amount over the range 150 to 900 ng per band; the correlation coefficient was 0.9997, indicating a good relationship between peak area and amount. Recovery from 98.46 to 101.11% showed the accuracy of the method was excellent. The method is very accurate, simple, and cost effective, and enables sensitive quantitative analysis of 6-gingerol.

Restricted access

Trikatu Churna is an important formulation in Ayurveda — the Traditional System of Indian Medicine. It consists of fine powders of fruits of Piper nigrum L., Piper longum L., and rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe in equal proportions. Piperine, present in both P. nigrum and P. longum, is considered to be responsible for the improvement of digestion and bioavailability enhancement of many medicaments. Gingerols and 6-shogaol are key chemical molecules in Z. officinale. Piperlongumine is present in P. longum fruits but absent in the fruits of P. nigrum. We report a validated high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) method for the determination of piperine, piperlongumine, and 6-shogaol in these herbs and in Trikatu Churna. Piperine, piperlongumine, and 6-shogaol resolved well in n-hexane—ethyl acetate (8:2) on precoated silica gel 60 F254 plates. The absorption maxima for piperine, piperlongumine, and 6-shogaol were found to be 327, 272 and 235 nm, respectively. Linearity for the corresponding markers was observed between 0.1–0.5, 0.2–1.0, and 0.1–1.6 μg spot−1, respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 28 and 100, 56 and 200, and 32 and 100 ng for piperine, piperlongumine, and 6-shogaol, respectively. Recovery experiments showed 99.6%, 99.5%, and 99.7% recoveries for piperine, piperlongumine, and 6-shogaol, respectively. P. nigrum fruits from Delhi and Ahmedabad had around 2.0% w/w piperine, while fruits of P. longum from these markets were analyzed for 0.8% and 0.6% w/w piperine. Piperlongumine was not found in both samples of P. nigrum, while the fruits of P. longum had 0.36% and 0.26% w/w piperlongumine. Z. officinale from Delhi had 0.19% w/w of 6-shogaol as against 0.16% w/w found in the sample from Ahmedabad. Plant materials procured from Delhi were employed for the preparation of Trikatu Churna which showed 96.5%, 95%, and 103% w/w of the expected values of piperine, piperlongumine, and 6-shogaol, respectively. The present method is simple, reproducible, and reliable which can be applied for the routine analysis of Trikatu Churna and its ingredients in polyherbal formulations.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Br, Ca, Cl, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained fromCentella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Solano lycocarpum, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Solidago microglossa andStryphnondedron barbatiman plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyldithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results were evaluated by analyzing biological reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed is briefly discussed.

Restricted access

A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect the Indian iso­late of banana bunchy top virus at early stages of infection in banana suckers before symptom expression. The viral DNA was detected from a single viruliferous banana aphid (Pentalonia nigronervosa) at 1.0 kb. The six plant species viz., Zingiber officinale, Colocasia esculenta, Cathe­ranthus roseus, Canna indica, Hedychium coronarium and Alphi­nium sp. upon inoculation with BBTV showed negative results in PCR assay. Using PCR assay the BBTV could be detected in meristem tip cultured banana plants before symptom expression. In field condition the meristem tip cultured banana plants expressed BBTV symptom 45 days after planting.

Restricted access

Okigbo, R. N., Nmeka, I. A.: Control of yam tuber with leaf extracts of Xylopia aethiopica and Zingiber officinale . African Journal of Biotechnology (Kenya) 4(8 ), 804–807 (2005). Nmeka I. A

Restricted access
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: S. Eleawa, I. Bin-Jaliah, M. Alkhateeb, N.M.K. Bayoumy, R. Alessa, and Hussein Sakr

, Asparagus racemosus and Zingiber officinale. Ind. J. Pharm. 34, 100–110 (2002) Sairam K Anti-ulcer drugs from indigenous sources with emphasis on Musa sapientum, Tamrabhasma, Asparagus racemosus and Zingiber officinale Ind

Restricted access

. S. Lakshmi M. Sudhakar 2010 Protective effect of Zingiber officinale on gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity in rats Int. J. Pharmacol. 6 58 – 62 . [30]. M. Kadkhodaee H. Khastar M. Faghihi R. Ghaznavi M

Restricted access

22 187 307 Ekpo, M. A. and Nwaankpa, I. L. (2005): Effect of crude oil on microorganisms and growth of ginger (Zingiber officinale ) in the tropics

Restricted access

. Stoilova , I , Krastanov , A , Stoyanova , A , Denev , P , Gargova , S . Antioxidant activity of a ginger extract (Zingiber officinale) . Food Chem . 2007 ; 102 : 764 – 770 . 10.1016/j.foodchem/2006

Restricted access

Ahmed, R. S., Seth, V., Pasha, S. T., Banerjee, B. D. (2000) Influence of dietary ginger ( Zingiber officinales Rosc) on oxidative stress induced by malathion in rats. Food Chem. Toxicol. 38 , 443

Restricted access