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Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez IX. Miskolc

Addenda to the history of goldsmith’s art in Hungary IX. Miskolc

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Jegyzetek 1 Kőszeghy Elemér: Magyarországi ötvösjegyek a középkortól 1867-ig.Budapest, 1936 (továbbiakban: Kőszeghy 1936), 226. (A jegykönyvben közölt jegyekre a továbbiakban „K

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Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VI. Nagyszombat (I. rész: 15–17. század)

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VI. Nagyszombat / Trnava (Part I: 15–17th centuries)

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

: Magyarországi ötvösjegyek a középkortól 1867-ig. Budapest 1936, 268, Országos Magyar Iparművészeti Múzeum Régi egyházművészet országos kiállítása. Budapest 1930, 286. sz.; Egyházi gyűjtemények kincsei. Magyar Nemzeti Galéria. Budapest 1970 (a kiállítást rendezte

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Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VIII. Veszprém, Nyitra

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VIII. Veszprém, Nyitra

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The article is the eighth part of the titular series. The goldsmith's art in Veszprém was elaborated in a monographic study by Árpád Somogyi, while Nyitra in former upper Hungary (Nitra, SK) has no such summary. The author now collates the goldsmiths known by name from the registers of births, marriages and deaths, and from tax registers with types of objects included in the 18th century price-lists (limitatio). He identifies the cup of Tótvázsony made in 1761 as the work of Mihály Nánai, and attributes other art works appearing in the art trade to 18–19th century masters. The chief novelty in Nyitra is the attibution of 19th century works to the Szodomka family and János Ludvig.

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This is the sixth part of a series of publications about the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary based on archival sources, registrars, citizens’ registers, guild documents, tax registers processed by cities and regions. The goldsmiths and silversmiths revealed by the above documents by name are compared with the old research literature to rectify its data on the one hand, and on the other, goldsmith's marks and objects are attributed to the particular artists. The present publication reviews the history of goldsmith's art in Nagyszombat (today Trnava, Slovakia), the first part of which – the 15–17th century – was released in Művészettörténeti Értesítő 2009/1. Now the equally rich output of the 18–19th centuries is taken stock of, together with the names of several artists. Some published art works are known from public collections, others from private owners or art dealers.

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Kísérlet néhány magyarországi ötvösjegy feloldására XII.

An attempt to solving some Hungarian goldsmith's marks XII

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The study is the new installment of a series running already for 22 years. The author systematically collects masters' marks of goldsmith's ware mostly cropping up in the art trade, trying to identify the towns and masters with the help of earlier research literature (Elemér Kőszeghy, 1936; Ilona P. Brestyánszky, 1977), often correcting the information they provide. The work is complemented by thorough archival research, with all available data about identified goldsmiths in city registers being published. The present paper first identifies the works and marks of Pest goldsmiths (Ferenc József Trautzl around 1780, József Trautzl around 1824–39, János Lehman, 1862, János Krieck, 1829, I. József Pasperger, around 1780), followed by a new master's mark of Wenzel Gretschl of Buda on a work of 1821. He discussed some of them earlier, too; now he calls attention to some forged objects. A separate unit comprises the goldsmithing of Bán (Bánovce, Slovakia) and Rozsnyó (Rožnava, Slovakia) in Trencsén county: in the former town János Oravszky and János Ottó worked almost synchronously (around 1828), while the son of Bán goldsmith Leopold Goldner, Anton, can be documented in Rozsnyó. In addition to 19th century goldsmiths of Gyöngyös (János Goldberger) and Kecskemét (Dávid Auslener), he has data on an 18th century master of Miskolc (Ferenc Szombati, between 1750 and 1795). In Pécs, he attributes a new work to the earlier presented Jakab Posz, then he enriches our knowledge of the goldsmiths of the one-time capital of Hungary, Pozsony with new marks and objects (Fidelis Mayer, József Steinmassl, János Hauck, Mihály Ehrenhoffer, Joannes Gerick, Joseph Weinstabl from the first half of the 19th c.). Finally he introduces the earlier completely unknown goldsmithing in the market town of Tolna through the 19th c. work of Lajos Schulz.

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Kísérlet néhány magyarországi ötvösjegy feloldására XIII.

An Attempt to Solving some Hungarian Goldsmith's Marks XIII

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The study is the new installment of a series running already for 23 years. The author systematically collects masters' marks of goldsmith's ware mostly cropping up in the art trade, trying to identify the towns and masters with the help of earlier research literature (Elemér Kőszeghy, 1936; Ilona P. Brestyánszky, 1977; Emília Földes 1978), often correcting the information they provide. The work is complemented by thorough archival research, with all available data about identified goldsmiths in city registers being published. The present paper identifies the works and marks of Pest goldsmiths (Ignác Ábrahámfy, Károly Steindl, Lajos Müller, Károly Stammer, first half of 19th century).

The next unit comprises the goldsmithing of Eger, Győr, Kolozsvár (Cluj-Napoca, Romania) (Josephus Mikovinyi, Adolf Ecker, György Péterfy, János Sárga) and Nagyvárad (Oradea, Romania) (Károly Schvambek) of 19th century. He enriches our knowledge of the goldsmiths of the one-time capital of Hungary, Pozsony (Bratislava, Slovakia) with new marks and objects (Melchior Gassur, Leopod Dorfner, Johann Christoph Holstein from the 17–18th centuries), and from Pozsony-Vártelek from the 19th century.

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