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A hitújítás korai szakasza arra irányult, hogy az előző kor építészetétől és művészetétől elhatárolódjon. A zsinati határozatok ebben a vallásilag átmeneti állapotban próbálták a művészet és építészet helyét a formálódó egyház életében definiálni. Ha a zsinati határozatokat nézzük, megállapít_h

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A turócszentmártoni Szent Márton-templom késő reneszánsz és barokk funerális emlékei (16–17. század)

Late Renaissance and baroque funerary monuments in the St Martin church at Turócszentmárton (Martin) (16–17th centuries)

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Authors:
Zuzana Ludiková
,
Árpád Mikó
, and
Géza Pálffy

reneszánsz művészet Magyarországon, 16–17. század. Szerk. Mikó Árpád–Verő Mária . Budapest 2008, II., 25 – 53 . 12. CJH – Magyar törvénytár. (Corpus Juris Hungarici) 1657–1740. évi törvényczikkek

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Clipeus Christianitatis. Egy nagymúltú európai szállóige képi megjelenítésének változatai Magyarországon a 17. század második felében és a 18. század elején

Clipeus Christianitatis variants of the visualization of a time-honoured european adage in Hungary in the second part of the 17th and early 19th centuries

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Szilágyi

christianitatis . Egy európai szállóige időszerűsége és képi megjelenítésének változatai a 17. század második felében . In: Papp 2020 , 231 – 250 . Tarnai Andor : A consultatio Magyarországon. A politikai nevelés irodalmi formáinak és stílusának

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Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VI. Nagyszombat (I. rész: 15–17. század)

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VI. Nagyszombat / Trnava (Part I: 15–17th centuries)

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Abstract

The paper is a chapter in the systematic exploration of goldsmith's art in historical Hungary. While in another series of publications, the author summarizes the historical information on goldsmith dynasties in various towns, matching it with the extant works. He makes an attempt to redefine the 16–17th century proof-marks. Here, he relies on the registers of Nagyszombat (today: Trnava in Slovakia). In the Addenda he publishes proof-marks and objects who have wrongly attributed to masters from Nagyszombat.

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Habsburg-propaganda és polgári erények: Lackner Kristóf és az alkalmazott emblematika Sopronban a 17. század elején

Habsburg Propaganda and Civic Virtues: Christoph Lackner and Applied Emblematics in Early Seventeenth-Century Sopron

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Ágnes Kusler
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Dávid és Jónátán

A szerelem és a barátság allegóriája

David and Jonathan

Allegory of love and friendship
Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Zoltán Szilárdfy

The friendship of David and Jonathan is known from the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament. The presentation of the robe, the sword, the bow and the belt is the token of covenant. David’s death lament, an elegy over Jonathan’s bow given to him was called the bow song. Gottfried Bernhard Göz, a painter and graphic artist of Moravian origin working in Augsburg captured the story in an engraving with dotting. His rococo compositions were models for several painters. The oil painting in the diocesan museum of Székesfehérvár was probably made in Göz’s workshop.

The same theme features on the obverse of a 17th century silver coin recently included in the author’s collection. (The German legend reads ICH WILL DIR THUN WAS DEIN HERZ BEGEHRT – SAM. 20. V. 4) The reverse of the medal also expresses fraternity through the figures of Abraham and Lot (inscribed: WIR SIND GEBRUDER – Gen. 13. v. 8.) with well-to-do shepherds and their livestock in the background.

The art of Göz, his excellent knowledge of the Holy Writ and its use in allegories of vitues help us better interpret the baroque iconography.

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A Megváltó Vérrel Éltető Szentháromság Egy Különleges Képtípus Közép-Európában

The Holy Trinity with The Saviour's Blood as Nutriment a Peculiar Picture Type in Central Europe

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Zoltán Szilárdfy

Abstract

A special iconographic interpretation of the Holy Trinity is represented by an engraving kept in the Strahov abbey library of the Premonstratensian canons of Prague. The print was made after Dionysius Strauss' drawing and is the artist's first extant holy image engraved in copperplate. In the monastery of Hradiško u Olomouce Strauss was regarded as the artist of the order respected for the inventiveness of his themes. It is a known fact from 1695 that he presented a painting on the birthday of prior Bernard Wanzke showing the crucified Christ with the Father and the Holy Spirit with lambs feeding on the blood gushing forth from the Son's side. Undoubtedly, the graphic sheet marked “P. Dion. Straus delin. — J. Tscherning sculp.” was made after the lost painting. The words in the banderole above the composition “ut vitam habeant” (that they may have life) are from St John's gospel (Jn 10,10).

A somewhat modified variant of the theme is a copperplate engraving also from the late 17th century by Johann Gaspar Gutwein (1669–1730) who worked in Prague, Brno, Augsburg, Regensburg and Graz. The print marked “J. G. Gutwein sc. Brunae” probably adorned the flyleaf of a book. This precious specimen of my private collection shows an infant angel with clasped hands behind the cross, with a quotation from St Luke's gospel on the banderole falling down by its elbow: “… parata sunt omnia” (all things are now ready, Luke 14,17). The words refer to the feast of the flock of the Saviour. The blood and water from the side of Christ collected in a pearl-shell refer to the life-giving and maintaining sacraments of baptism and the eucharist from which the scrawny lambs will gain strength.

There is a little known 18th century oil painting in the St Maurice Benedictine monastery of Bakonybél. There are no inscriptions, but white lambs are feeding on the life-giving blood which has cleaned them, flowing from Christ's side into a bowl. The tree of paradise with the serpent is in the background to indicate that Christ's sacrifice on the cross was made in reparation of the original sin: Christ defeated Satan on the cross. This peculiar version of the Holy Trinity representations originated from catholic Moravia in the Tridentine revival of spirituality in Central Europe, as the above described depictions suggest.

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Abstract

A small panel (Hungarian private collection) depicting the scene of giving comission for a portrait was sold off at the Ernst Museum's 34th auction in 1927 as a work by Gonzales Coques. When in 1995 the painting cropped up again, I proposed an attribution to “the circle of Gerard ter Borch” and a dating to around 1650, but the distinctly portrait-like representation of the characters held the promise of a more exact identification. During the investigation I soon arrived at a studio interior in which – according to the traditionally identification – “Daniel Seghers is sitting for his portrait in the atelier of Gonzales Coques”. Auctioned under the name of Coques several times, the authorship of the work has been widely contested by experts – with good reason – and most recently it is only labelled “by a Flemish painter”. As for the sitter, it is quite probable that he is the Jesuit monk Daniel Seghers who painted flower still-lives. Though in his authentic portrait, the one showing him in profile also used by Cornelis de Bie, he is as an older man with a small moustache and beard, his demeanor, his bony face structure and earnest glance are very similar.

I went on looking for the painter of these two scenes among the Flemish followers of Coques on the basis of style criticism and found analogies in the figures of Charles Emmanuel Bizet. However, biographical data made me discard this hypothesis.

Proceeding along the identification of facial features I concluded that the portratist in the two pictures does not resemble any of the known portraits of Coques, but one can recognize Lucas Franchoys the younger on the basis of the engraved portrait also published by Cornelis de Bie. Another figure of the scene can be identified on this basis: Peeter Franchoys sitting by the table, looking at Seghers and pointing at the companion writing next to him. To conclude, the two pictures were painted by Lucas Franchoys II, and the known biographical data allow for a dating between 1645 and 1649.

Further, I have also identified Lucas Franchoys II's features in another two paintings known in the art trade. A small panel shows a man clipping tobacco, probably representing the sense of smell from a series of The Five Senses painted by Lucas Franchoys, hiding a self-portrait in it. The other is a high-quality work by Peeter Franchoys showing his younger brother a few years later when both of them were living in Mechelen.

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