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Let

\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$e_n (S;x) = |x| - x\frac{{p(x) - p( - x)}} {{p(x) + p( - x)}},$$ \end{document}
We prove: for all n ≧ 1 and x ∈ [−1, 1] we have
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$|e_n (S;x)| \leqq \frac{1}{{n^2 }},$$ \end{document}
where equality holds if and only if n = x = 1 or n = 1, x = −1. This refines a result of Brutman (1998), who showed that the inequality
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$|e_n (S;x)| < \frac{8} {{e^2 (n^2 - 1)}}$$ \end{document}
is valid for all n ≧ 2 and x ∈ [−1, 1].

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Abstract

We extend the result in [11] to the spaces of homogeneous type built in [2] starting from two sets of different dimensions with a unique point of contact.

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Abstract  

We deal with some functional inequalities which are motivated by the following relation between the geometric mean G, the logarithmic mean L and the arithmetic mean A:

\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$G^{\frac{2} {3}} \cdot A^{\frac{1} {3}} \leqq L \leqq \frac{2} {3}G + \frac{1} {3}A.$$ \end{document}

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Abstract  

The psi function ψ(x) is defined by ψ(x) = Γ′(x)/Γ(x) and ψ (i)(x), for i ∈ ℕ, denote the polygamma functions, where Γ(x) is the gamma function. In this paper, we prove that the functions

\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$[\psi '(x)]^2 + \psi ''(x) - \frac{{x^2 + 12}} {{12x^4 (x + 1)^2 }}$$ \end{document}
and
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\frac{{x + 12}} {{12x^4 (x + 1)}} - \{ [\psi '(x)]^2 + \psi ''(x)\}$$ \end{document}
are completely monotonic on (0,∞).

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Abstract  

A convex set is inscribed into a rectangle with sides a and 1/a so that the convex set has points on all four sides of the rectangle. By “rounding” we mean the composition of two orthogonal linear transformations parallel to the edges of the rectangle, which makes a unit square out of the rectangle. The transformation is also applied to the convex set, which now has the same area, and is inscribed into a square. One would expect this transformation to decrease the perimeter of the convex set as well. Interestingly, this is not always the case. For each a we determine the largest and smallest possible increase of the perimeter.

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