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Mohan D., Chander S. Removal and recovery of metal ions from acid mine drainage using lignite — A low cost sorbent, Journal of Hazardous Materials , Vol. 137, No. 3, 2006, pp. 1545

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Abstract  

Uranium in acidic mine drainage from the former Ogoya Mine in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, and in neutral surface waters from its surrounding rivers was investigated from the viewpoint of radioactive disequilibrium in the uranium decay series. Water samples were periodically collected from the mine pithead and its surrounding rivers and their U isotopes (238U and 234U) were measured together with chemical components. The 238U concentrations in the water samples varied widely from 0.0036 to 0.78 mBq/L with a factor of about 200. High 238U concentrations were observed in the strongly acidic drainage (pH: around 3.5) from the pithead and the 234U/238U activity ratios showed significant values of as high as 10–15. By taking into account of the measurement of Th isotopes, it appeared that probable processes controlling the high 234U/238U activity ratios in acidic mine drainage were due to that the acidic water flowing from the mine pithead was formed only in the upper water layer of the pits and 234U was preferentially leached in the deeper underground water under the neutral and reducing conditions.

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Abstract  

The aim of this study is to employ a thermogravimetric analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer to research into the influence of heating rate and sample mass on the response of the detector. That response is examined by means of a particular efflorescence taken from an acid mine drainage environment. This mixture of weathered products is mainly composed by secondary sulfate minerals, which are formed in evaporation conditions, appearing as efflorescence salts. Thermogravimetry coupled to mass spectrometry has been used to analyze the three main loss steps that happen when this combination of minerals is heated from 30 to 1,100 °C. This inorganic material is based on a mixture of hexahydrite, zinc sulfate hexahydrate, apjonite, gypsum, plumbojarosite, calcite, quartz, and magnetite. While heating, three main effluent gases evolved from this efflorescence. At a standard heating rate of 10 °C/min, loss of water (dehydration) occurred over 30–500 °C in four major steps, loss of carbon dioxide (decarbonisation) occurred over 200–800 °C in three steps, and loss of sulfur trioxide (desulfation) occurred over 400–1,100 °C in three steps. According to the results, thermal analysis is an excellent technique for the study of decomposition in these systems.

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Ríos C. A., Williams C. D., Roberts C. L. Removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage (AMD) using coal fly ash, natural clinker and synthetic zeolites, Journal of Hazardous Materials , Vol. 156, No. 1–3, 2008, pp. 23

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Macalady L. D., Smith S. K., Ranville F. J. Acid mine drainage; streambed sorption of copper, cadmium and zinc, Colorado Water Resources Research Institute, Completion Report , No. 154, 1990. Clement R. E., Eiceman G

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. Remediation of acid mine drainage by means of biological and chemical methods Advanced Materials Research: Biohydrometallurgy: From the Single Cell to the Environment 2007

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Pollack Periodica
Authors: Vlasta Harbuľáková, Adriana Eštoková, Alena Luptáková, Nadežda Števulová, and Gabriel Janák

removal from acid mine drainage. Chemical Paper , Vol. 102, 2008, pp. 343–344. Kovaliková N. Testing of various sorbents for copper removal from acid mine drainage

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Abstract  

In situ leaching of uranium ores with sulfuric acid during active uranium mining activity on the Gessenheap has caused longstanding environmental problems of acid mine drainage and elevated concentrations of uranium. To study there remediation measures the test site Gessenwiese, a recultivated former uranium mining heap near Ronnenburg/East Thuringia/Germany, was installed as a part of a research program of the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena to study, among other techniques, the phytoremediation capacity of native and selected plants towards uranium. In the first step the uranium speciation in surface seepage and soil pore waters from Gessenwiese, ranging in pH from 3.2 to 4.0, were studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Both types of water samples showed mono-exponential luminescence decay, indicating the presence of only one major species. The detected emission bands were found at 477.5, 491.8, 513.0, 537.2, 562.3, and 590.7 nm in case of the surface water samples, and were found at 477.2, 493.2, 513.8, 537.0, 562.4, and 590.0 nm in case of the soil water samples. These characteristic peak maxima together with the observed mono-exponential decay indicated that the uranium speciation in the seepage and soil pore waters is dominated by the uranium (VI) sulfate species UO2SO4(aq). Due to the presence of luminescence quenchers in the natural water samples the measured luminescence lifetimes of the UO2SO4(aq) species of 1.0–2.6 μs were reduced in comparison to pure uranium sulfate solutions, which show a luminescence lifetime of 4.7 μs. These results convincingly show that in the pH range of 3.2–4.0 TRLFS is a suitable and very useful technique to study the uranium speciation in naturally occurring water samples.

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Wei X., Viadero R. C. Jr., Buzby K. M. Recovery of iron and aluminum from acid mine drainage by selective precipitation, Environmental Engineering Science , Vol. 22, No. 6, 2005, pp. 745–755. Buzby K. M

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Szucs, A., Jordan, G., Qvarfort, U.: 2002. Geochemical modelling of acid mine drainage impact on wetland stream using landscape geochemistry, GIS and statistical methods. In: Fabbri, A.G., Gaal, G., McCammon, R.B.: Deposit and Geoenvironmental Models for

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