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): Ten aphid species (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae) as prey for Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Eur. J. Entomol. 95, 343–349. Kalushkov P. Ten aphid species

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Uroleucon cichorii (Koch, 1855) Aphis intybii (Koch, 1855) and Aphis fabae cirsiiacanthoidis Scopoli, 1763 colonies occurred on Cichorium intybus L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. was colonised by Aphis fabae cirsiiacanthoidis. Artemisia vulgaris L. accommodated Macrosiphoniella artemisiae (Boyer de Fonscolombe, 1841). The annual Crepis setosa Haller was the host plant of Uroleucon cirsii (Linnaeus, 1758) and Uroleucon cichorii. The perennial Picris hieracioides L. also accommodated Uroleucon cirsii. Centaurea arenaria M. Bieb. ex Willd. and Centaurea stoebe L. subsp. micranthos (Gugler) Hayek accommodated Uroleucon jaceae (Linnaeus, 1758). Carduus acanthoides L. was colonized by Uroleucon aeneum (Hille Ris Lambers, 1939). Artemisia absinthium L. was the host of Macrosiphoniella absinthii (Linnaeus, 1758). Achillea millefolium L. was colonized by Macrosiphoniella millefolii (De Geer, 1773).

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Jarošik, V., Honěk, A. and Tichopád, A. 2003. Comparison of field population growths of three cereal aphid species on winter wheat. Plant Protection Science 39(2): 61–64. Tichopád A

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Survey of aphids on dicotyledonous herbaceous plants along the Hungarian highways on 33 sampling points revealed the presence of 14 aphid species on gymnosperm trees. The most frequent conifer species was: Pinus nigra J. F. Arnold 1785 (21 locations) followed by Pinus sylvestris L.1753, Picea abies (L.) H. Karst. (4 locations), Juniperus communis L. 1753 (3 locations) and Juniperus virginiana L. 1753 (1 location), Thuja occidentalis L.1753 (2 locations), Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don (1 location).

Eulachnus agilis (Kaltenbach, 1843) was the most frequently collected aphid species on Pinus nigra, followed by Cinara brauni Börner, 1940, Cinara schimitscheki Börner, 1940, Eulachnus rileyi (Williams, 1911) and Cinara acutirostris Hille Ris Lambers, 1956. The less frequent Cinara species was Cinara piniphila (Ratzeburg, 1844) which is a new record for the Hungarian fauna. Pinus sylvestris accommodated three aphid species: Cinara intermedia Pašek, 1954 was the most frequent, followed by Cinara pinea (Mordvilko, 1895) and Eulachnus agilis. Picea abies accommodated Cinara piceae, Cinara pruinosa (Hartig, 1841), Cinara piceicola (Cholodkovsky, 1896) and Sacchiphantes abietis L. 1758. Juniperus communis and J. virginiana most frequently hosted Cinara juniperi (De Geer, 1773). Eulachnus agilis occurred once on Juniperus communis. A single aphid species Cinara tujafilina was found on Thuja occidentalis and Thuja plicata.

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Flight activity and species composition of alata aphids was monitored by yellow water pan traps for 20 years (1982-2001). Yellow pan traps were placed into potato fields, the species composition of potato colonizing aphids was also studied in Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary. The results of the study are relevant to the region of Kisalföld. The dominance of the aphid species was the following: A. nasturtii 44%, M. euphorbiae 6%, M. fragariae 1% and M. persicae 49%. Based on our data M. persicaee dominated among the species that damaged potatoes in the region of Kisalföld. Linear regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between the relative number of species caught and those living on the plants R2=0.7734 proving a reliable forecast. There was significant relationship between number of flying and potato colonizing aphids and the mild temperature values (R2=0.5224 and 0.4494), respectively. There was a strong relationship between the effective heat sum, calculated from the temperature data between 1st May and 31st August, and the number of aphids caught in traps and those of feeding on the plants R2=0.8755 and 0.9233, respectively.

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Literature Barney , J. N. and DiTomasso , A. ( 2003 ): The biology of Canadian weeds . 118. Artemisia vulgaris L. Can. J. Plant Sci. 83 , 205 – 215 . Basky , Z. ( 2016 ): Aphid species colonizing perennial Asteraceae host

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187 Andrásfalvy, P. (1971): A magyar faunában ismeretlen vagy kevéssé ismert levéltetvek (Hom., Aphidoidea) (Unknown and less known aphid species in the Hungarian fauna [Hom., Aphidoidea

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85 90 Andrásfalvy, P. (1971): A magyar faunában ismeretlen vagy kevéssé ismert levéltetvek (Hom., Aphidoidea) (Unknown and less known aphid species in the Hungarian fauna [Hom

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A survey of Pulsatilla grandis Wender revealed the presence of four aphid species colonizing Greater Pasque Flower in Hungary. Aphis pulsatillicola Holman, 1966 the monoecious Pulsatilla feeding aphid species is a new record for the Hungarian fauna. The development of Cavariella theobaldi Gilette Bragg, 1918 on the isolated silky seed head proves that the host alternating aphid species (primary hosts are Salix species and summer hosts are Umbelliferae plants) was able to develop from nymph to alatae on P. grandis. Winged forms develop in response to unsatisfactory quality of a host plant, while on suitable host apterae are produced. The polyphagous Aphis fabae Scopoli 1763 and Aphis gossypii Glover 1877 were able to overwinter and the progenies of fundatrices developed into wingless apterae on P. grandis.

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Survey of aphids on dicotyledonous herbaceous plants along the Hungarian highways on 33 sampling points revealed the presence of the rare cruciferous feeding aphid species Smiela fusca forming small colony on horse radish (Armoracia rusticana). Smiela fusca is not only a new record for the Hungarian aphid fauna, but we found S. fusca colonizing a new host species, A. rusticana.

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