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G. Richter, F. Gabrieli, I. c Abbās and M. Zakeri conducted fundamental research on Al-Adab al-ṣaġīr which is attributed to Ibn al-Muqaffa c . They concluded that this work is spurious. This view is generally accepted by most of the scholars. The primary objective of the first section of this article is to add some comments and information to their research, as well as to argue that Al-Adab al-ṣaġīr is very likely an authentic work of Ibn al-Muqaffa c . It is plausible that he compiled Pahlavi texts which he translated, and prefaced this compilation with an introduction. In the second section of this article I will discuss the question of the titles of some of Ibn al-Muqaffac c ’s compositions, such as the Kitāb al-ādāb al-kabīr, Al-Adab al-ṣaġīr, Al-Yatīma , and the Polemic against Islam . This article is the second of a series on Ibn al-Muqaffa c ’s oeuvre . The first article of this series La Lumière et les Ténèbres dans l’œuvre d’Ibn al-Muqaffa c (Light and Darkness in Ibn al-Muqaffa c ) was published in a previous volume of the AOH (61/3). The next article of this series, “Reason, Religion and Power in Ibn al-Muqaffa c ”, will be published in one of the next issues.

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Until now thee Nestorian theology has been known in Greek, only from indirect hostile, sources. In the Arabic literature, however, there are known works that deal the Nestonian theology in its entirety and, in addition, in Nestorian spirit. The examination of the often occurring term maˁanā in Arabic Nestorian texts indicates that these Arabic texts are based on a thorough knowledge of Aristotle’s philosophy, so this term must be taken in various passages in various meanings, but its most important equivalent is ousia.

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The subject matter of the present research is mediaeval Arabic literature in the 8th to 15th centuries, dealing with horses and hippology. Numerous descriptions of horses have been left to us from this period, the most renowned authors being Abū ‘Ubayda, al-Aṣma‘ī, Ibn Sīda and Ibn Qutayba. The present article has made extensive use of these works and subjected the explanations found therein to a comparison with dialectical variants of the various body parts of a horse, for instance, the different sections of the forehead, the croup, the side or the hoof. The classical meanings of these body parts have sometimes radically changed by now, in other instances the meanings have been extended, and part of the classical vocabulary has simply disappeared, or survived but in a completely altered new sense.

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This article deals with Chapter V of Kitāb al-Ṭibb al-Rūḥānī of Abū Bakr al-Rāzī (Rhazes) which is concerned with ˓ishq (love) and entitled Fī al-˓Ishq wal-Ilf wa-Jumlat al-Kalām fī al-Ladhdha or “On Love and Intimacy and a Summary Account of Pleasure”. In this chapter, al-Rāzī propounds the idea that love is an unfortunate condition that leads to subservience and surrender, madness and enervation. Previous studies on Kitāb al-Ṭibb al-Rūḥānī show that al-Rāzī based his work on the maladies of the self on Plato, Galen and the tradition of Hedonism. In this article, however, I intend to explore al-Rāzī’s views on ˓ishq and aim to contextualise them within the framework of mediaeval Arabic love theory. I propose to show, moreover, that al-Rāzī’s psychology, or more specifically his argument over ˓ishq, is based not only on “a blend of materialistic and Platonic elements”, as Lenn Evan Goodman asserts, and on “lively debates typical of Hellenistic philosophy”, as Thérèse-Anne Druart claims, but his contemplation which derives from his perception of the vicissitudes of the society and his endeavours to demolish what he considers mistaken ideas of love which were promulgated by some works of mediaeval Arabic literature. By doing so, Chapter V could be considered an exemplar of a form of mediaeval applied ethics which “addresses the moral permissibility of specific actions and practices” as it occurred in the society.

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, Harvard University. Reinert , Benedikt : Madjāz: In Arabic Literature. In: The Encyclopaedia of Islam . 2nd edition. Vol. 8 , pp. 1025 – 1026 .

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developments of how falconry became a status marker after the Islamic conquests. Anna Akasoy examined the role of falconry in Arabic literature and other sources. She maintains that ’we need to be clear about terminology: falconry as hunting with birds is one

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