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( Araneae) vizsgálata . Növényvédelem 52 : 287 – 297 . Bali , L. , Andrési , D. , Szinetár , Cs. and Tuba , K. 2017 . Léknyitás hatása talajközelben élő pókközösségre

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125 Marc, P, A. Canard and F. Ysnel. 1999. Spiders (Araneae) useful for pest limitation and bioindication. Agr. Ecosyst. Environ. 74: 229

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Marc, P., Canard, A. and Ysnel, F. (1999): Spiders (Araneae) useful for pest limitation and bioindication. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 74, 229–273. Ysnel F. Spiders

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36 375 389 Frick, H., Nentwig, W. and Kropf, C. 2007. Influence of stand-alone trees on epigeic spiders (Araneae) at the Alpine timberline. An

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Natural habitat edges are known to influence the vegetation structure, the microclimate and thereby the invertebrate assemblages. We studied the spiders of two forest edges in the forest-steppe zone of the Great Hungarian Plain (Site 1: a dense juniper shrub — open grassland and Site 2: a juniper and poplar forest — open grassland edge, respectively). The spider assemblages were sampled with pitfall traps arranged in 5 × 20 grid at the habitat edges. Observed and estimated species richness was higher for the grasslands than for the forests. Renyi’s diversity ordering was applied to compare species diversity. The results showed that the grasslands were more diverse in terms of spider species than the forests. The composition of spider assemblages was significantly different between the two habitat types. At Site 2, a higher number forest specialists penetrated into the grassland. Presumably this was due to the shading effect of the nearby poplar trees. Constrained ordinations also revealed a strong influence of the neighbouring poplar trees and vegetation structure on the spider assemblages. No exclusively edge associated species were found on either of the two sharp forest edges.

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Carabid beetles and spiders are at the top of the hierarchy of general invertebrate predators, which can help to reduce the abundance of harmful forest pests. They are also frequently used as environmental indicators. In this paper we analyzed the abundance, species richness and changes in carabid beetle and spider assemblages in three treatments of pine forest regeneration – natural, natural with soil prepared by ploughing and artificial with seedlings planted in ploughed soil. The most beneficial forest regeneration treatment variant of forest regeneration for carabid beetles and spiders was the natural regeneration of pine stands without any preceding soil preparation. Both taxa responded strongly to soil ploughing. We also noted the replacement of forest species by less sensitive open area species. In carabid assemblages, large changes in the trophic structure were observed, as predatory species were replaced by hemizoophages in the ploughed treatments.

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Community Ecology
Authors: F. Samu, F. Kádár, G. Ónodi, M. Kertész, A. Szirányi, É. Szita, K. Fetykó, D. Neidert, E. Botos and V. Altbäcker

Recent environmental and land use changes have made wildfires more frequent in natural habitats of the Kiskunság Sand Ridge on the Hungarian Plain. In a study initiated 2.5 years after an extensive fire that destroyed half of the area of a sand grassland — juniper, poplar forest steppe habitat, we assessed the effects of fire on two generalist arthropod groups: spiders and carabid beetles, as well as on the vegetation. Utilizing the natural experiment situation, samples were taken by pitfalls and suction sampling during a 1.5 years period in four 1 ha blocks, two of which were on the burnt part of the habitat, and two in the unburnt control. At the time of the investigation, in the burnt area the vegetation in the grass layer showed a quick but not complete recovery, while the canopy layer of the juniper bushes burnt down with no sign of regeneration. Carabid beetles and spiders showed differences in recovery after fire. In the carabid assemblages of the burnt parts — compared to the unburnt control — there were over three times more beetles, out of which significantly more represented the macropterous life form and granivorous feeding strategy. There was a higher ratio of pioneer species and a simplified assemblage structure in the burnt area, which meant that the conservation value of the carabid assemblage became lower there. In contrast, for the spider assemblage quantitative changes in abundance and species numbers were not significant, and the differences in species composition did not lead to a decrease in conservation value. Spider species in the burnt plots could not be described as pioneer species, rather they had ecological characteristics that suited the changed vegetation structure. Comparing the two groups, to repopulate the burnt areas, dispersal abilities proved to be more limiting for carabids. However, in both groups a strong assemblage level adaptation could be observed to the postfire conditions. In spiders, species with a stratum preference for the grass layer prevailed, while in carabids individuals with granivore strategy gained dominance. Thus, despite the differences in their speed, basically both assemblages tracked vegetation changes. The effect of future fires will depend on their scale, as well as land-use practices, such as grazing, that interact with fire frequency and recovery. If extensive fires in the future permanently change the vegetation, then it would also lead to a fundamental change in the arthropod fauna.

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Community Ecology
Authors: J. Herrmann, U. Kormann, C. Schüepp, Y. Stocker, F. Herzog and M. Entling

Habitat isolation is expected to reduce population densities of animals via reduced immigration. However, altered trophic interactions in isolated habitats may modify these effects, especially since the strength of isolation effects is expected to increase with trophic rank. Here, we studied effects of habitat isolation on a food-web module consisting of herbivorous beetles, predatory spiders, spider-preying wasps and arthropod-feeding birds. We compare two systems that were studied in subsequent years: a study on 29 mature apple orchards that varied in the degree of isolation from forest, and a study on 20 groups of newly planted cherry trees that showed similar variation in their degree of habitat isolation. No birds were observed on the young fruit trees. Wasps and spiders showed the expected lower abundances in isolated habitats. On mature trees, birds were present and showed lower abundances in isolated habitats. Wasps were reduced to a similar degree by habitat isolation as on the young trees. Surprisingly, spider densities on the mature trees were higher in isolated than in connected habitat. This contrasting response of spiders to habitat isolation is likely to be due to release from bird predation in isolated mature orchards. In both study systems, beetles showed no significant effect of habitat isolation. Our results confirm that the sensitivity to fragmentation increases with trophic rank, and suggest that trophic interactions should receive more attention in fragmentation studies.

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The impact of disturbance on animal and plant assemblages has been described mainly in terms of aggregate community properties like species richness, abundance, or productivity. However, the question how disturbance acts on species interactions, particularly on patterns of co-occurrence, has received much less attention. Here we use a large pitfall trap sample of spiders from two complexes of lake islands in Northern Poland to show how disturbance by tourist visits affects species richness, composition and co-occurrence. On the pristine and protected islands of Lake Wigry, species co-occurrence was significantly segregated. Further, island species richness and abundances could be predicted from environmental correlates, particularly from island area, soil fertility and humidity. In turn, on the lake islands that are frequently visited by tourists, species co-occurrences were random and environmental correlates other than island area failed to predict species richness and abundances. However, species composition, α-, β-, and γ-diversities, as well as average local spider abundances did not significantly differ between both island complexes. Our results show that disturbance disassembles the structure of spider communities prior to visible richness and abundance effects. This result has implications for biological conservation. The detection of community disassembly might be an early sign for factors that act negatively on ecosystem functioning.

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25 561 566 Bogya, S. (1999): Spiders (Araneae) as polyphagous natural enemies in orchards. Dissertation, University of Wageningen

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