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, C. G. (eds) (1957) Poona. Vols I-III. Reprint 1978. Arthaśāstra see Kangle, R. P. (ed.) (1969). Avadānaśataka see Vaidya, P. L. (ed.) (1958a

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Economic thought and the principles of economic policy appear in a full-fledged form in the Arthasastra of Kautilya, a text which has gained its present form between the fourth century B.C. and second century A.D. Although a great deal of ideas in this text concerning government and politics reappear in the early medieval times economicpolicy fell into totaloblivion. Kasyapiyakrsisukti, a Sanskrit text tentatively dated from the early medieval period has come down to us in a single manuscript and belonged to the group of forgotten Sanskrit works up to the recent times. Verses 683-777 form a lucid treatise on economic policy which had its roots in the Arthasastra and at the same time contain new ideas originating from the contemporary conditions.The type of economydepicted here reminds us of the situation in early medieval Europe.

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KA II, 11, 28–41 is the earliest extant Sanskrit text on ratnaśāstra ‘gemmology’. It is a branch of traditional science and it reflects a great deal of experimental knowledge of jewellers. The present paper analyses the structure of the established text, seeks for an answer why the passages concerning diamond follow the list of the precious stones proper and why emerald is missing. The readings offered by the manuscripts and commentaries have been rechecked and the Kangle’s text has been revised at places. The revised portions of the text have been retranslated and accompanied with the necessary notes. From our investigations it has become clear that the extant text is very loosely edited and highly problematic; the text presents a mixture of vārttāśāstra (textbook of economy) and ratnaśāstra ; there are terminological inconsistencies; it seems that gemmology had existed before the edition of the KA and the place of birth of this science was South India.

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