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maps of the Third Military Survey of Austria–Hungary and on the survey maps of the Military Geographical Institute (Wojskowy Instytut Geograficzny) in Warsaw in the light of survey manuals . Polish Cartographical Review 47 ( 2015 ): 31 – 43

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The Austro-Hungarian Monarchy’s military missions on the Balkans can provide the only experience in Hungarian history that can be connected with a notion of colonization. The paper scrutinises some Hungarian writers’ responses to that experience. Kálmán Mikszáth as a journalist shows a shift in attitude; he strongly criticized the occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, but eventually he proudly advertised a colonizing discourse. The most important monument of the 40-year connection with Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Hungarian culture was János Asbóth’s monography in two volumes entitled Bosnia and Herzegovina . In that work the celebration of modernisation, westernisation, the development of economy and infrastructure does not imply racism and religious intolerance. The short stories by István Tömörkény that describe the military life in the sanjak Novi Bazar offer a careful analysis of the cultural and linguistic aspects of the experience of otherness in the multicultural Balkan environment.

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:252). Following these premises, the trajectories of social actions comprising nature conservation and regional economic development in Slovenian-Austrian-Hungarian tri-border area appeared to be the main topic of research. The article attempts to analyze the

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Neues zur Urbanistik der Zivilstädte von Aquincum-Budapest und Carnuntum-Petronell

Auswertung und archäologische Interpretation der geophysikalischen Messungen 2011 und 2012

Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors:
Stefan Groh
,
Orsolya Láng
,
Helga Sedlmayer
, and
Paula Zsidi

In this paper the new results of an Austrian-Hungarian research cooperation (2011–2014) on the urbanism of the Civil towns of Aquincum and Carnuntum are to be presented. In synthesis of geophysical surveys, the interpretation of archaeological excavations and the reinterpretation of elder evidences, a new picture of the diachronic development of the two Civil Towns from an early vicus to a fortified city can be drawn.

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Abstract  

We have compared patenting propensity in the Czech Republic with eight EU countries: Germany, Austria, Hungary, Poland, Finland, Belgium, Ireland and Greece. In comparison based on the EPO and USPTO patents listed per million inhabitants, the Czech Republic ranks rather low. The Czech Republic also generated fewer patents per R&D employee than most other countries. The time series data have shown a decrease of number of Czech patents after 1990 with some revival after 1996. As our analysis indicated, the decrease was partially caused by dissolution or transformation of major patent generators, but the most important cause may lie in a little interest of local enterprises.

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Abstract  

We have compared bibliometric data of Czech research papers generated from 1994 to 2005 with papers from six other EU countries: Austria, Hungary, Poland, Finland, Ireland and Greece. The Czech Republic ranked the fifth in number of papers per thousand inhabitants and the sixth in number of citations/paper. Relatively the most cited were Czech papers from fields Engineering and Mathematics ranking the third, and Computer Science, Environment/Ecology and Molecular Biology ranking the fourth among 7 EU countries. Our analysis indicates that Czech research is lagging behind the leading EU countries, but its output is proportional to the R&D expenses.

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Most armed forces of the world do employ military chaplains to increase the willingness of the troops, and to provide the necessary spiritual support on the battlefield or even during the peacetime service. Austria-Hungary acted likewise by setting up its own system, which has been proven to be extremely useful during World War I. It is not commonly known, but a large number of Jewish soldiers were enlisted in the different armed forces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and they were supported by field rabbis from the very beginning of the conflict. This institution was unique among the armies of the Central Powers in such an extended form. In my study I would like to provide a resume of this structure and offer an insight into the very important work conducted by military chaplains — rabbis, in this particular case — in state of war.

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The study analyses the young Ernő Dohnányi's career as a pianist, his reception, repertory, and the performances of his compositions in Austria, Hungary, Germany, and England. By the first decade of the 20th century, Dohnányi had won almost universal recognition with critics and musicians alike, but his art was truly appreciated not so much by the sensationalist public as by a significantly narrower circle of musically literate listeners. After his first tours, Dohnányi did not enter any such biographical stage which we could term his “virtuoso years”, but his “Vienna years” (1901-1905) belong to the next stage of his development. His concert life resembled that of a “classic” performer, who still gives recitals fairly regularly, while also composing symphonic pieces and conducting them himself. He retained his artistic and personal freedom through resisting the travelling virtuoso lifestyle offered by impresarios. The author gives a selection from press reports of Dohnányi's career in the Viennese years.

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A century ago, Bihar/Bihor County was a rather unremarkable corner of the Hungarian Kingdom, one situated far from international boundaries. The population of Bihar/Bihor was almost equally split between ethnic Hungarians and ethnic Romanians, a fact of little consequence until the last decades of the nineteenth century, when a number of middle-class national activists began to emphasize the region’s status as a national borderland and worked to define and defend the Hungarian-Romanian border they saw running through it. This essay explores the nationalists’ efforts through a local cultural association, A Biharvármegyei Népnevelési Egyesület (Bihar County Society for Popular Education). Its aim is to show that the sharp lines that appeared on maps of “the nationalities of Austria-Hungary” emerged in a particular historical context, and also that these lines were much more blurry than many mapmakers and historians would have us believe.

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Abstract

Slovakia is heir of everything, what left its tracks on the territory. It is heir of art, which has not only Slavic-Slovak, but also German–Austrian–Hungarian origins, with Franco-Roman touch. It was suppressed or underlined by catholic–protestant–Jewish–orthodox (but also free-thinking and free-mason) traditions. It is out of doubt that Slovaks do not exist from the world's beginning, but that they have become Slovaks and everything, that had a significant value for them, could be national. A crucial role played the national identity; but in most cases, this cannot be traced back. Therefore, it has only a limited role within history of art. The study speak for overcoming the very national-defensive character of the historiographies and focusing on more interesting matters.

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