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Abstract  

This paper represents a description of eight compiled benchmark tests conducted to probe and to demonstrate the extensive utility of the Ortec ISOTOPIC gamma-ray analysis software program. The paper describes tests of the programs capability to perform finite geometry correction factors and sample-matrix-container photon absorption correction factors. Favorable results are obtained in all benchmark tests.

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International Safety and Quality Standards on the Competitiveness of Mediterranean Fresh Produce. Imperial College. Allan, S. (1997): Partners benchmarking. http:/www.benchmarking

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respective 2009 national Excellence University project. This consideration allows us to carryout an interesting benchmarking exercise between national and international universities. Data were collected from the French Ministere de l’Enseignement Superieur

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Abstract  

An article assessment system based on both Tianjin University and nine key Chinese Universities’ academic disciplinary benchmarks was established to evaluate researcher’s published papers. With this scientific benchmarking system, the quality of a researcher’s papers could be easily located in a percentile scale in corresponding field within certain groups. Several factors, including total number of papers, order of authors, impact of journals, citation count, h-index, e-index, a-index, m-quotient, etc., were also utilized for both quantity and quality analysis. Furthermore, the novel proposed weighted citation analysis was introduced to judge a researcher’s contribution to his/her research outcomes. The convenient application and comprehensive evaluation property of this assessment system was thoroughly discussed via a given example.

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clear information on the positioning of their institutions in relation to the others. In this respect, benchmarking exercises, which enable a given institution to learn from peers, could be highly useful, if, of course, these peer institutions were

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Abstract  

A collection of coauthored papers is the new norm for doctoral dissertations in the natural and biomedical sciences, yet there is no consensus on how to partition authorship credit between PhD candidates and their coauthors. Guidelines for PhD programs vary but tend to specify only a suggested range for the number of papers to be submitted for evaluation, sometimes supplemented with a requirement for the PhD candidate to be the principal author on the majority of submitted papers. Here I use harmonic counting to quantify the actual amount of authorship credit attributable to individual PhD graduates from two Scandinavian universities in 2008. Harmonic counting corrects for the inherent inflationary and equalizing biases of routine counting methods, thereby allowing the bibliometrically identifiable amount of authorship credit in approved dissertations to be analyzed with unprecedented accuracy. Unbiased partitioning of authorship credit between graduates and their coauthors provides a post hoc bibliometric measure of current PhD requirements, and sets a de facto baseline for the requisite scientific productivity of these contemporary PhD’s at a median value of approximately 1.6 undivided papers per dissertation. Comparison with previous census data suggests that the baseline has shifted over the past two decades as a result of a decrease in the number of submitted papers per candidate and an increase in the number of coauthors per paper. A simple solution to this shifting baseline syndrome would be to benchmark the amount of unbiased authorship credit deemed necessary for successful completion of a specific PhD program, and then monitor for departures from this level over time. Harmonic partitioning of authorship credit also facilitates cross-disciplinary and inter-institutional analysis of the scientific output from different PhD programs. Juxtaposing bibliometric benchmarks with current baselines may thus assist the development of harmonized guidelines and transparent transnational quality assurance procedures for doctoral programs by providing a robust and meaningful standard for further exploration of the causes of intra- and inter-institutional variation in the amount of unbiased authorship credit per dissertation.

Open access
Scientometrics
Authors: Éric Archambault, Étienne Vignola-Gagné, Grégoire Côté, Vincent Larivi?re, and Yves Gingrasb

Summary  

The goal of this paper is to examine the impact of linguistic coverage of databases used by bibliometricians on the capacity to effectively benchmark the work of researchers in social sciences and humanities. We examine the strong link between bibliometrics and the Thomson Scientific's database and review the differences in the production and diffusion of knowledge in the social sciences and humanities (SSH) and the natural sciences and engineering (NSE). This leads to a re-examination of the debate on the coverage of these databases, more specifically in the SSH. The methods section explains how we have compared the coverage of Thomson Scientific databases in the NSE and SSH to the Ulrich extensive database of journals. Our results show that there is a 20 to 25% overrepresentation of English-language journals in Thomson Scientific's databases compared to the list of journals presented in Ulrich. This paper concludes that because of this bias, Thomson Scientific databases cannot be used in isolation to benchmark the output of countries in the SSH.

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Abstract  

The fusion reactor inventory code FISPACT, together with the European Activation File EAF, is the European reference software for calculating the neutron-induced activation of fusion reactor relevant materials. Experimental verifications (benchmarks) of the code predictions have been performed at ENEA Frascati by means of an irradiation facility consisting of a D-T neutron generator and a moderator/reflector structure which is employed to mimic the neutron spectrum at the a fusion device first wall. Various materials (vanadium alloy, SiC, AISI 316, martensitic steel F82H, copper, tungsten, iron, niobium), candidates to be used in a fusion reactor, have been exposed to neutrons produced in the facility (about 109 n cm–2 s–1) and the short and medium-lived induced radioactivity has been measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results have been used to validate the inventory code FISPACT, the physical database EAF, including its uncertainty predictions, and the composition of the material irradiated in particular for its minor elements and impurities. The comparison between calculated (C) and experimental results (E) is reported as C/E values and shows a satisfactory agreement for almost all radionuclides. Radionuclides for which there is not agreement between calculations and experiments are also discussed and an analysis of the causes of the lack of agreement is carried out.

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Abstract  

Fluorine research has been identified as a priority area in South Africa and the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (NECSA) is embarking in an effort to expand its hydrogen fluoride and aluminium trifluoride production capacity. On the eve of those efforts this article reports the findings of an effort to map and assess fluorine research in South Africa in comparison to four other countries i.e. Malaysia, Australia, Germany and Italy. The results of the assessment are aimed at guiding future directions for fluorine research in the country, at identifying centres of expertise nationally where new research chairs could be established, at identifying international centres of expertise to be utilised for collaboration and of course for inter-temporal benchmarking of fluorine research in South Africa. South Africa is identified to be producing a small number of fluorine research publications in comparison to other countries like Germany and Italy which produce orders of magnitude larger number of publications and in comparison to country’s total research effort. Furthermore the relevant research effort appears to be dispersed geographically and in disciplinary terms. Relevant recommendations are provided with particular emphasis on the pluralistic science policy approach followed in the country.

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During the last ten years there were systematic works carried out in Croatia on the realisation and implementation of the new height system. The results of these works, based on the analysis and completely new processing of the existing archive data of geometric levelling measurements, are the basis for the introduction of the new Croatian height system into official usage. As the introduction of the new height system has direct impact on the changes of national control network benchmark heights, it is necessary to determine and investigate the changes and relations between the “old” and “new” heights of benchmarks. For this purpose, the benchmark heights in the national geometric levelling control networks have been compared and analysed at the north-western part of the territory of the Republic of Croatia chosen to be representative test area. Comparison results are achieved and presented in this paper.

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