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-Óssy, S. 1957: A Budai-hegység barlangjai (The caves of the Buda Mts). -- Földrajzi Ért., 6, pp. 155-167. A Budai-hegység barlangjai (The caves of the Buda Mts) Földrajzi Ért

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Central European Geology
Authors: Edit Borbás, József Kovács, Katalin Fehér, Gábor Vid, and István Gábor Hatvani

. Berényi Üveges I. , J. Berényi Üveges , G. Vid 2006 : Adalékok a Baradla-barlang fejlődésének elméletéhez üledék vizsgálatok alapján (The evolution of the Baradla cave on the basis of sediment analysis) . — Karszt és Barlang

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— S. Borzsák : Csákvári-barlang. In: Magyarország fokozottan védett barlangjai [Caves of Hungary with priority protection]. Ed. K. Székely Budapest 2003. 334–336 Holéczy 1829 = [M.] Holéczy

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cigányok a CS-lakás programban. Valóság 56(10):80–98. References Cited Bakó , Ferenc 1977 Bükki barlanglakások [Cave Dwelling in the Bükk] . Miskolc : Herman Ottó Múzeum . Bársony , János 2008 Romák sorsa az 1940-es évek második

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Central European Geology
Authors: Attila Demény, Alexandra Németh, Zoltán Kern, György Czuppon, Mihály Molnár, Szabolcs Leél-Őssy, Mihály Óvári, and József Stieber

, temperature changes, vegetation, and soil biological activity. A widely accepted method to establish a proxy-environment transfer function is cave monitoring when physical and chemical parameters are monitored outside and inside the cave in order to determine

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The So-called “Mithraic Cave” of Angera

A New Perspective from Archaeological Investigations

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Stefano De Togni

Summary

The existence of a mithraeum at Angera (VA, Italy) was assumed for the first time in the 19th century, after the discovery of two Mithraic inscriptions re-used as ornaments of a private garden in the middle of the small town. The location of the alleged mithraeum is still uncertain: the inscriptions have been found out of context, and the place of worship has never been localized.

The “Antro mitraico” (Mithraic Cave), also known as “Tana del Lupo”, is a natural cave situated at the base of the East wall of the cliff on which the Rocca Borromeo (the Castle of Angera) stands. At the cave the most visible archaeological evidences are tens of breaches cut into the outside rocky wall, which probably contained votive inscriptions or stele. These elements denote the use of the cave as a place of worship.

In 1868 Biondelli identified in the cave the location of a Mithraic cult, giving rise to a theory that continues still today. If, on the one hand, the proposal appeared plausible, there is no clear evidence that in the cave a mithraeum was ever set up; besides, the presence of many an ex voto is in conflict with the mysteric ritual practices. This paper is intended to present an analytical study of the monument, with a broader inquiry on the characteristics of mithraea and other sanctuaries within natural caves.

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Introduction The mineral ardealite is known as a cave mineral and has been found in many caves worldwide [ 1 – 6 ]. Phosphates have been known to exist in the Jenolan Caves for a very long time [ 7 – 9 ]. Dating of clays in

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Abstract  

Radon can accumulate in underground areas such as show caves. Repairmen and tourist guides working in such caves may thus be exposed to significant radiation doses. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the radon concentration to estimate the exact radiation dose caused by radon. Considering that the radon concentration in caves usually shows significant seasonal fluctuations, the monthly change of radon concentration was studied for 1 year in nine show caves opened to the public in Hungary. Despite the fact that all of the caves were formed in karst rocks, the annual average radon concentration levels were rather different between each other (541–8287 Bq m−3). The significant monthly fluctuation of the radon concentration indicates that the annual average radon concentration in caves can only be accurately obtained by year-long measurements.

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2015 . '‘Jinnian Tulufan fojiao shikusi kaogu de xin shouhuo 近年吐鲁番石窟寺考古 的新收获 [New discoveries of archaeological investigations in the Buddhist caves in Turfan] In: Abdurishid Y akup (ed.) Studies in Central Asian Philology, Papers of the

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Abstract  

Radon concentration measurements were carried out using solid-state nuclear track-etch detectors (SSNTDs) type CA 80-15 cellulose nitrate films, in a Pleistocenic cave at Petralona, in Halkidiki, Northern Greece, at 55 km from the city of Thessaloniki. Radon levels as high as 88 kBq.m-3 (2.38 nCi.l-1) have been recorded inside the cave equivalent to 11.90 WL in terms of occupational exposure to radon and its decay products. Absorbed dose rates were performed using TL dosimeters, type TLD-200 (CaF2-Dy) in a continuous monitoring program (integrated measurements). Dose rate levels as high as 110 nGy.h-1 were recorded inside the cave. In interpreting the high levels of radiation doses, radioactivity measurements regarding the naturally occurring 238U, 232Th and 40K radionuclides were carried out in various speleothems found at different sites in the cave.

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