Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "Central Asian Buddhism" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

This paper presents an edition of a newly identified Old Uyghur fragment of the Lotus Sūtra from the Krotkov collection in the Institute of Oriental Manuscripts of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The text mainly explains the merit of preaching, reciting and hearing the Lotus Sūtra through three parables, claiming that the text is from the nom čäčäki sudur ‘Law-Flower-Sūtra’, the Old Uyghur title of the Lotus Sūtra. However, there is no identical passage in the known Chinese translations of the Lotus Sūtra. Presumably, the Old Uyghur text is a unique composition by Uyghurs, though one cannot exclude the possibility that the Old Uyghur text might also be a translation of an unknown Chinese text of similar content.

Restricted access

This paper deals with an edition of a newly identified fragment of the Uṣṇīṣavijayā Dhāraṇī in Old Uyghur from Turfan, which is preserved in the collection of Museum für Asiatische Kunst (Museum of Asian Art) in Berlin. The fragment basically represents the dhāraṇī part of the Uṣṇīṣavijayā Dhāraṇī in Old Uyghur script. The fragment is compared with the parallel Old Uyghur fragments that also include the dhāraṇī section and are preserved in the Berlin Turfan collection. The transcription and transliteration of the work is given. Its versions in other languages are compared to explore differences between the texts. Finally, a reconstructed text is presented.

Restricted access

In the present article some unpublished Buddhist Sogdian texts belonging to the German Turfan collection are studied. Apart from a small fragment from the Sogdian version of the Pañcaviṃśatisāhasrikā-mahā-prajñāpāramitā-sūtra , I selected those texts which belong to categories unknown or not well represented among the Buddhist Sogdian texts published so far. Thus, specimens of the vinaya literature, Zen Buddhism and apocryphal texts are cited. One group of fragments contains Tocharian loanwords and is likely to have been translated from Tocharian, while another group is unique in that it is provided with a colophon in the Uighur language. Finally, various forms denoting “bodhisattva” are collected and in light of their distribution and number of occurrences among the texts I challenge the generally accepted view that they came into Sogdian via Parthian, and that the Uighur form bodisavt had its origin in Sogdian.

Restricted access

The Tocharian A Maitreyasamitināṭaka, a long dramatic text about the future Buddha Maitreya that is translated into Old Uyghur prose as the Maitrisimit, is one of the most important texts of Tocharian and Old Uyghur Buddhism. It is of crucial importance for Tocharian studies because even smaller fragments can often be interpreted successfully with the help of the better preserved Old Uyghur parallels. In this paper, the beginning of the 11th act about the birth of Maitreya is studied, comparing the Tocharian A and Old Uyghur fragments which are in part parallel and in part complementary.

Restricted access

. Matsui , Dai 2008b [MV: MATSUI 2008c]. ‘A Mongolian Decree from the Chaghataid Khanate Discovered at Dunhuang.’ In: Peter Zieme (ed.) Aspects of Research into Central Asian Buddhism. In Memoriam Kōgi Kudara . Turnhout : Brepols , 159 – 178

Free access