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Central and Eastern Europe: Catching up or lagging behind?

The Methodological Maze of the EU’s Method of Measuring Development

Society and Economy
Author: Zoltán Polyánszky

Dallago, B. (2001): Systemic Change and Asset Specificity — The Case of Transformation in Central and Eastern Europe. Acta Oeconomica 51(4): 435–468. Dallago B. Systemic Change and

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The article introduces the different interpretations of corporate governance, and presents its developments in Central and Eastern Europe. After analysing historical backgrounds, the author discusses the socialist era's corporate governance methods. Regarding transition to market economy, new processes of the region are presented, outlining the influence of different Western models. Finally a chapter on Hungarian corporate governance analyses the legal and practical developments in the country from the roots to date.

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): Banking in Central and Eastern Europe since the Turn of the Millennium — An Overview of Structural Modernization in Ten Countries. OENB Focus , 2005/2, Vienna. Barrell, R. — Davis, E. — Fic, T. — Orazgani, A. (2009): Household

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References Berend , I. ( 2003 ): History Derailed: Central and Eastern Europe in the ‘Long’ Nineteenth Century . Berkeley, CA : University of California Press

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Spillovers from foreign direct investment in Central and Eastern Europe

An index for measuring a country’s potential to benefit from technology spillovers

Society and Economy
Authors: Balázs Szent-Iványi and Gábor Vigvári

In the paper, we construct a composite indicator to estimate the potential of four Central and Eastern European countries (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia) to benefit from productivity spillovers from foreign direct investment (FDI) in the manufacturing sector. Such transfers of technology are one of the main benefits of FDI for the host country, and should also be one of the main determinants of FDI incentives offered to investing multinationals by governments, but they are difficult to assess ex ante. For our composite index, we use six components to proxy the main channels and determinants of these spillovers. We have tried several weighting and aggregation methods, and we consider our results robust. According to the analysis of our results, between 2003 and 2007 all four countries were able to increase their potential to benefit from such spillovers, although there are large differences between them. The Czech Republic clearly has the most potential to benefit from productivity spillovers, while Poland has the least. The relative positions of Hungary and Slovakia depend to some extent on the exact weighting and aggregation method of the individual components of the index, but the differences are not large. These conclusions have important implications both the investment strategies of multinationals and government FDI policies.

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Berend, Ivan T. (2005) ’What is Central and Eastern Europe?’ European Journal of Social Theory , Vol. 8, No. 4, 401–416. Berend I. T. What is

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The significant differences among the Central and Eastern European countries in their economic and agricultural development have a bearing on their food and nutrition situation. This paper, following brief introductory sections relating to the key demographic and economic indicators, highlights the trends in per capita food and agricultural production and per capita food availability, including the quality of the average diet. Finally the extent of food insecurity in the different countries is discussed.

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This paper investigates the relationship between the overall perception of the level of corruption and that of the quality of the ruling regime. Two subsets of political regimes are analysed — the neo-democracies from Latin America (LA) and Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). The principal thesis advanced here is that corruption affects negatively the quality of neo-democracy. However, the current research tries also to discover the specific mechanism by which this is achieved in practice. It is hypothesised that legitimacy, or, even, the particular way of legitimising the fledgling democracies, is the key. Legitimisation is mainly about the support granted to a specific policy and the regime as a whole. It has been demonstrated that the entire process has an input and output side. It is presumed that, during transition to democracy and its eventual consolidation, on the input side, both the opportunity structures (political institutions, legal tools and different kinds of both formal and informal practices) for citizens’ participation and control of the ruling elites are created, while, on the output side, legitimacy is achieved by producing concrete results regarding, for instance, the fight against corruption as well as the provision of a whole range of public goods, which enshrine the common aspirations of the majority of the population about democracy and human rights.

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assessment of Eastern European and C. I. S. countries 9 53 Andreff, W. (2000): Foreign direct investment in Central and Eastern Europe, Keynote speech, 3rd

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. EBRD Hotopp, U. - Radosevic, S. - Bishop, K. (2005): Trade and Industrial Upgrading in Countries of Central and Eastern Europe: Patterns of Scale- and Scope-based Learning

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