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Scientometrics
Authors: André Padial, João Nabout, Tadeu Siqueira, Luis Bini and José Diniz-Filho

Abstract  

Citation frequency has been considered a biased surrogate of publication merit. However, previous studies on this subject were based on small sample sizes and were entirely based on null-hypothesis significance testing. Here we evaluated the relative effects of different predictors on citation frequency of ecological articles using an information theory framework designed to evaluate multiple competing hypotheses. Supposed predictors of citation frequency (e.g., number of authors, length of articles) accounted for a low fraction of the total variation. We argue that biases concerning citation are minor in ecology and further studies that attempt to quantify the scientific relevance of an article, aiming to make further relationships with citation, are needed to advance our understanding of why an article is cited.

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influence of the citation frequency of patents on the market value of the patents and the companies possessing the patents (e.g., Hall et al. 2005 ; Nagaoka 2005 ). These findings imply that the citation frequency (i.e., the number of forward citations) of

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Abstract  

This study examines the relationship between citation frequency and the human capital of teams of authors. Analysis of a random sample of articles published in top natural science journals shows that articles co-authored by teams including frequently cited scholars and teams whose members have diverse disciplinary backgrounds have greater citation frequency. The institutional prestige, the percentage of team members at U. S. institutions and the variety of disciplines represented by team member backgrounds do not influence citation frequency. The study introduces a method for evaluating the extent of multidisciplinarity that accounts for the relatedness of disciplines or authors.

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Abstract  

The article deals with the statistical problem of the difference between the mean citation frequencies of two sets of papers required to be significantly different. An analysis of citation data indicated that, as a first-order approximation, (1) The relative spread due to a short observation interval is independent of the long-term citation frequency and (2) the relative spread in long-term citation frequencies of different papers from the same author is independent of the mean citation score for the papers by that author. As a rule-of-thumb, these two sources of variance can be characterized by standard deviations of a ratio (factor) of 2 and 3, respectively. By applying these results to citation data published in the literature, it is shown that sometimes statistically unjustified conclusions have been drawn in the past.

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Abstract  

Context. The use of citation frequency and impact factor as measures of research quality and journal prestige is being criticized. Citation frequency is augmented by self-citation and for most journals the majority of citations originate from a minority of papers. We hypothesized that citation frequency is also associated with the geographical origin of the research publication. Objective. We determined whether citations originate more frequently from institutes that are located in the same country as the authors of the cited publication than would be expected by chance. Design. We screened citations referring to 1200 cardiovascular publications in the 7 years following their publication. For the 1200 citation recipient publications we documented the country where the research originated (9 countries/regions) and the total number of received citations. For a selection of 8864 citation donor papers we registered the country/region where the citing paper originated. Results. Self-citation was common in cardiovascular journals (n = 1534, 17.8%). After exclusion of self-citation, however, the number of citations that originated from the same country as the author of the citation recipient was found to be on average 31.6% higher than would be expected by chance (p<0.01 for all countries/regions). In absolute numbers, nation oriented citation bias was most pronounced in the USA, the country with the largest research output (p<0.001). Conclusion. Citation frequency was significantly augmented by nation oriented citation bias. This nation oriented citation behaviour seems to mainly influence the cumulative citation number for papers originating from the countries with a larger research output.

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across sections is analyzed. Third, the distribution discipline of co-citation proximity in different levels under different co-citation frequencies circumstances are analyzed, the relationship between co-citation proximity and co-citation frequency is

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the word frequency distribution, are both part of power-law distribution. Scholars found that this power-law distribution exists in the citation frequency distribution either. Price's study ( 1965 ) on the networks of scientific papers reported that

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frequencies of the paired journals are retrieved from the citation database and put into the square symmetric journal co-citation matrix with the data in the diagonal cells treated as missing data. Afterwards, the co-citation frequencies matrix is converted

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Scientometrics
Authors: Jacob B. Slyder, Beth R. Stein, Brent S. Sams, David M. Walker, B. Jacob Beale, Jeffrey J. Feldhaus and Carolyn A. Copenheaver

extreme specialization of a journal may limit an article's exposure and result in a low-citation frequency (Van Dalen and Henkens 2001 ). The introduction of impact factors for journals, lends high-ranked journals to be perceived as high

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Abstract  

The theoretical introductions in empirical journal articles have been analyzed looking for factors determining citation habits. Own-country-biases and English-American predominance in citations were not regularly found. Preferred language of the cited publications and absolute citation frequencies were dependent upon both the disciplines and the countries where the journals are published. However, relative citation frequencies (citations related to the length of the text available) have been found to be rather constant across countries (within psychology and psychiatry, respectively) which indicates no such dependence.

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