Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 32 items for :

  • "Cone calorimeter" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

killed by this heat [ 9 – 11 ]. Previous studies have investigated the fire behavior and evaluated the safety of a variety of building materials by using cone calorimeter testing. However, as most of the fire behavior assessment for interior upholstery

Restricted access

Abstract  

Burning behavior of small-scale wood crib was studied by a serial of cone calorimeter tests. The heat release rate curves of these small wood cribs were different due to porosity factor and this shows that the control condition switches from one to another. The burning of some crib with small porosity factors was self-extinguished in fixed flow rate of air supply in cone calorimeter. These results were compared with Gross’s studies. The switch point of porosity-controlled and surface area controlled burning regime is different from Gross’s result.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Cone calorimeter tests were conducted to investigate the flammability of glass-reinforced plastics (GRP) panels. The results gained from these bench scale tests were used to predict the time to flashover in the ISO 9705 room, which was partly covered by GRP panels. Östman and Tsantaridis’ empirical linear regression model and multiple discriminant function analysis (MDA) were used in the prediction. Three room-scale GRP fire tests were conducted in ISO 9705 room and the results were compared with the prediction.

Restricted access

Combustion and thermal properties of paper honeycomb

Treatment of phosphorus-based flame retardant agents

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Dong-Ho Rie, Sung-Woong Moon, and Kyung-Bum Lim

bromine-based flame retardant agents. Cone calorimeter test For combustion tests, a cone calorimeter test (ISO 5660 standards, manufacturing by ASTM E 1354 [ 6 ], Cone Calorimeter 2006, Festec International Co., Ltd

Restricted access

epoxy carbon fiber composites. Their flammability behaviors were investigated by cone calorimeter. The thermo-oxidation stability and low gas permeability of buckypapers or CNF nanofiber are key roles in improving flame-retardant properties of composites

Restricted access

cellulosic materials continue to be a research area of interests [ 6 – 8 ]. Paper sheets represent a model material not used before for cone calorimeter study. These sheets consist solely of cellulose, which eliminates the effect of lignin and hemicelluloses

Restricted access

Abstract  

Organic–inorganic hybrid composites of epoxy and phenyltrisilanol polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (Ph7Si7O9(OH)3, POSS-triol) were prepared via in situ polymerization of epoxy monomers. The nanocomposites of epoxy with POSS-triol can be prepared in the presence of metal complex latent catalyst, aluminum triacetylacetonate ([Al]) for the reaction between POSS-triol and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA). The dispersion morphology of organic–inorganic hybrid was characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The thermostability of composites was evaluated by thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis. The flammability was evaluated by cone calorimeter test. The presence of [Al] latent catalyst leads to a decrease in combustion rate with respect to epoxy and epoxy/POSS composites as well as reduction in smoke, CO and CO2 production rate. The effect of [Al] is to reduce the size of spherical POSS particles from 3–5 μm in epoxy/POSS to 0.5 μm in epoxy/POSS[Al]. Furthermore, POSS with smaller size may form compact and continue char layer on the surface of composites more efficiently.

Restricted access

maintained at 160 °C and the roller speed was 60 rpm. The samples are listed in Table 1 . The prepared composites were hot-pressed into sheets with suitable thickness and size for UL-94, LOI and cone calorimeter tests. Table 1

Restricted access

(FTIR), and cone calorimeter tests. The results in this study are compared with similar approaches described in the literature [ 5 – 13 ]. In previous research it was demonstrated that eluents from sugar beet residues could affect the flame

Restricted access