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Introduction Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) is a typical organic peroxides (OPs) [ 1 ] that is identified as type B of OPs by the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) of United Nations (UN

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A hierarchical set of kinetic models were proposed and discussed for simulation of autocatalytic decomposition of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in cumene at low temperatures. The hierarchy leads from a formal model of full autocatalysis, which is based on conversion degree as a state variable, through a two-stage autocatalytic concentration-based model to a meticulous multi-stage model of the reaction. By the ForK (Formal Kinetics) and DesK (Descriptive Kinetics) software, developed by ChemInform Saint Petersburg (CISP) Ltd., the related kinetic parameters and their significance have also been estimated and elucidated. Through this best-fit approach, it is possible to formulate a systematic methodology on the kinetic studies for thermal decomposition of typical organic peroxides with autocatalytic nature, specifically at low temperature ranges.

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Over 90% of the cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) produced in the world is applied in the production of phenol and acetone. The additional applications were used as a catalyst, a curing agent, and as an initiator for polymerization. Many previous studies from open literature have verified and employed various aspects of the thermal decomposition and thermokinetics of CHP reactions. An isothermal microcalorimeter (thermal activity monitor III, TAM III), and a thermal dynamic calorimetry (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC) were used to resolve the exothermic behaviors, such as exothermic onset temperature (T 0), heat power, heat of decomposition (ΔH d), self-heating rate, peak temperature of reaction system, time to maximum rate (TMR), etc. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry was used to analyze the CHP products with its derivatives at 150 °C. This study will assess and validate the thermal hazards of CHP and incompatible reactions of CHP mixed with its derivatives, such as acetonphenone (AP), and dimethylphenyl carbinol (DMPC), that are essential to process safety design.

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Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) being catalyzed by acid is one of the crucial processes for producing phenol and acetone globally. However, it is thermally unstable to the runaway reaction readily. In this study, various concentrations of phenol and acetone were added into CHP for determination of thermal hazards. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests were used to obtain the parameters of exothermic behaviors under dynamic screening. The parameters included exothermic onset temperature (T 0), heat of decomposition (ΔH d), and exothermic peak temperature (T p). Vent sizing package 2 (VSP2) was employed to receive the maximum pressure (P max), the maximum temperature (T max), the self-heating rate (dT/dt), maximum pressure rise rate ((dP/dt)max), and adiabatic time to maximum rate ((TMR)ad) under the worst case. Finally, a procedure for predicting thermal hazard data was developed. The results revealed that phenol and acetone sharply caused a exothermic reaction of CHP. As a result, phenol and acetone are important indicators that may cause a thermal hazard in the manufacturing process.

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and n = 1. Cumene Hydroperoxide (CHP) (CAS: 80-15-9) Cumene hydroperoxide is thought to have a half-order reaction ( n = 0.5) [ 24 ]. It is commercially available and several detailed kinetic studies are available

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processes. Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) is produced by the oxidation of cumene with air and as a catalyst in the process of aqueous sodium carbonate. In industry, there are over 94.5% of the CHP employed in producing phenol and acetone by means of

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Introduction This article contains the thermokinetics and safety parameters of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) manufactured in the first oxidation tower. Cumene is mixed with oxygen (O 2 ) or air to yield crude CHP in the oxidation

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Organic peroxides have been widely used in industries and are known to be self-reactive chemicals. In this paper, thermal and infrared spectroscopic analyses were carried out to obtain a better understanding of the thermally hazardous behavior of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) with cumene solvent. The temperature and heat flow profiles of different concentrations of CHP at scanning and isothermal conditions were measured with a small scale reaction calorimeter. Furthermore, probe type in situ infrared spectroscopic measurements were performed and the reaction mechanism will be discussed in regards to both energy release and product identification.

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Abstract  

The exothermic decomposition of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in cumene liquid was characterized by isothermal microcalorimetry, involving the thermal activity monitor (TAM). Unlike the exothermic behaviors previously determined from an adiabatic calorimeter, such as the vent sizing package 2 (VSP2), or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal curves revealed that CHP undergoes an autocatalytic decomposition detectable between 75 and 90°C. Previous studies have shown that the CHP in a temperature range higher than 100°C conformed to an n th order reaction rate model. CHP heat of decomposition and autocatalytic kinetics behavior were measured and compared with previous reports, and the methodology and the advantages of using the TAM to obtain an autocatalytic model by curve fitting are reported. With various autocatalytic models, such as the Prout-Tompkins equation and the Avrami-Erofeev rate law, the best curve fit among models was also investigated and proposed.

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Abstract  

Phenol is industrially produced by the Hock process, in which cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) is decomposed with sulfuric acid to obtain equimolar amounts of phenol and acetone. Use of the liquid acid requires subsequent neutralization and purification of the phenol at substantial cost, and a waste stream generation that could be avoided if an effective solid acid catalyst could be used. Modified clays exhibit attractive properties as solid acids. Acid treatment produces an increase in surface area and acidity. The present study was undertaken to modify bentonite clay by treatment with hydrochloric acid for the production of phenol and acetone via the decomposition of cumene hydroperoxide. The effects of various parameters such as acid activation, catalyst weight, concentration of CHP, reaction temperature and reusability of catalyst were studied. The results indicate that the acid-modified bentonite catalyst may be used instead of sulfuric acid for selective decomposition of CHP into phenol and acetone.

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