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Hooper, D.U., Chapin, F.S., Ewel, J.J., Hector, A., Inchausti, P., Lavorel, S., Lawton, J.H., Lodge, D.M., Loreau, M., Naeem, S., Schmid, B., Setala, H., Symstad, A.J., Vandermeer, J. and Wardle, D.A. 2005. Effects of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning

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, J.J. Ewel , A. Hector , P. Inchausti , S. Lavorel , J.H. Lawton , D.M. Lodge , M. Loreau , S. Naeem and B. Schmid . 2005 . Effects of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning: a consensus of current knowledge . Ecol. Monogr. 75 ( 1 ): 3

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Lavorel, S. and Garnier, E. 2002 Predicting changes in community composition and ecosystem functioning from plant traits: revisiting the Holy Grail. Funct. Ecol. 16: 545–556. Garnier E

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Community Ecology
Authors: N. C. Kenkel, N. C. Kenkel, D. A. Peltzer, D. A. Peltzer, D. Baluta, D. Baluta, D. Pirie, and D. Pirie

Huston, M.A. 1997: Hidden treatments in ecological experiments: re-evaluating the ecosystem function of biodiversity. Oecologia 110 : 449-460. Hidden treatments in ecological experiments: re-evaluating the ecosystem function of

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Community Ecology
Authors: R. Olmo Gilabert, A. F. Navia, G. De La Cruz-Agüero, J. C. Molinero, U. Sommer, and M. Scotti

Abstract

Anthropic activities impact ecosystems worldwide thus contributing to the rapid erosion of biodiversity. The failure of traditional strategies targeting single species highlighted ecosystems as the most suitable scale to plan biodiversity management. Network analysis represents an ideal tool to model interactions in ecosystems and centrality indices have been extensively applied to quantify the structural and functional importance of species in food webs. However, many network studies fail in deciphering the ecological mechanisms that lead some species to occupy the most central positions in food webs. To address this question, we built a high-resolution food web of the Gulf of California and quantified species position using 15 centrality indices and the trophic level. We then modelled the values of each index as a function of traits and other attributes (e.g., habitat). We found that body size and mobility are the best predictors of indices that characterize species importance at local, meso- and global scale, especially in presence of data accounting for energy direction. This result extends previous findings that illustrated how a restricted set of traitaxes can predict whether two species interact in food webs. In particular, we show that traits can also help understanding the way species are affected by and mediate indirect effects. The traits allow focusing on the processes that shape the food web, rather than providing case-specific indications as the taxonomy-based approach. We suggest that future network studies should consider the traits to explicitly identify the causal relationships that link anthropic impacts to role changes of species in food webs.

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. Differential Seedling and Regeneration in Openings and beneath Closed Canopy in Sub-tropical Wet Forest Diaz, S. and M. Cabido. 1997. Plant functional types and ecosystem function in

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Bond, W.J. 1994: Keystone species. In: Schulze, E.D. and Mooney, H.A., Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function. Springer Verlag, Berlin. pp. 237-253. Keystone species 237

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. 2000. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: importance of species evenness in an old field. Ecology 81:887-892. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: importance of species evenness in an old field

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Community Ecology
Authors: J. H. Fischer, C. F. McCauley, D. P. Armstrong, I. Debski, and H. U. Wittmer

Abstract

Seabirds are considered ecosystem engineers, because they facilitate ecosystem functioning (e.g., nutrient cycling), crucial for other marine and terrestrial species, including reptiles. However, studies of seabird-reptile interactions are limited. Here, we assessed the influence of the ‘Critically Endangered’ Whenua Hou Diving Petrel (Pelecanoides whenuahouensis) on the occurrence of two threatened skinks, Stewart Island green skink (Oligosoma aff. chloronoton) and southern grass skink (O. aff. polychroma). We surveyed skinks for 26 consecutive days at 51 sites with and 48 sites without Diving Petrel burrows in the dunes on Codfish Island (Whenua Hou), New Zealand. We used occupancy modelling to assess the influence of burrows on the occurrence of skinks, while accounting for other factors affecting occupancy (Ψ) and detection probabilities (p). Diving Petrel burrows had a contrasting effect on the occurrence of skinks. On average, Ψ̂ of Stewart Island green skinks was 114% higher at sites with burrows compared to sites without, while Ψ̂ of southern grass skinks was only 2% higher. Occurrence of both skinks was negatively influenced by the presence of the other skink species. On average p̂ were low: 0.013 and 0.038 for Stewart Island green and southern grass skinks, respectively. Stewart Island green skinks appear attracted to burrows, which might facilitate thermoregulation (i.e., shelter from temperature extremes). The larger Stewart Island green skinks may subsequently exclude the smaller southern grass skinks at burrows, causing the contrasting relationships. We suggest that these interspecific interactions should be considered when implementing conservation management, e.g., through the order of species reintroductions.

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The consequences of decline in biodiversity for ecosystem functioning is a major concern in soil ecology. Recent research efforts have been mostly focused on terrestrial plants, while, despite their importance in ecosystems, little is known about soil microbial communities. This work aims at investigating the effects of fungal and bacterial species richness on the dynamics of leaf litter decomposition. Synthetic microbial communities with species richness ranging from 1 to 64 were assembled in laboratory microcosms and used in three factorial experiments of decomposition. Thereafter, the functionality of the different microcosms was determined by measuring their capability to decompose materials with different chemical properties, including two species of litter (Quercus ilex L. and Hedera helix L.), cellulose strips and woody sticks. Incubation was done in microcosms at two temperatures (12°C and 24°C) for 120 days. The number of microbial species inoculated in the microcosms positively affected decomposition rates of Q. ilex and H. helix litters, while relationships found for cellulose and wood were not statistically significant. Diversity effect was greater at higher incubation temperature. We found lower variability of decay rates in microcosms with higher inoculated species richness of microbial communities. Our study pointed out that the relationships between inoculum microbial diversity and litter decomposition is dependent on temperature and litter quality. Therefore, the loss of microbial species may adversely affects ecosystem functionality under specific environmental conditions.

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