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Literature Abd-Rabou , S. ( 1999 ): Seven species of superfamily Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) new to Egypt . J. Agric. Res. 77 , 1205 – 1215 . Abd-Rabou , S. ( 2002 ): Revision of Aphelinidae (Hymenoptera) from Egypt . Second

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Literature Abd-Rabou , S. ( 1997 ): Key to the species of whiteflies from Egypt (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) . Bull. Soc. Ent. Egypt , 75 , 38 – 48 . Anderson , H. and MacLeod , A. ( 2008 ): CSL Pest Risk Analysis for Milviscutulus

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Toulibah, H. E. (2002): Phytoplankton species composition and some physico-chemical parameters of newly man made canal (El-Salam Canal), Egypt. - Egyp. J. Phyco. 3 : 17

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Literature Abd-Rabou , S. ( 2006 ): Hymenopterous parasitoids as a bioagent for controlling homopterous insects in Egypt . Egypt. Adv. Agric. Res. 6 , 1 – 65 . Abd-Rabou , S. and Ghahari , H. ( 2004 ): A revision of Encarsia

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: Geotechnique , Vol. 3. Geotechniqu 3 CONOCO 1987: The Geological map of Egypt with Scale 1

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Ahmed, A. M., Heikel, M. M., Mohammed, A. A. and Zidan, M. A. (1986): Field and laboratory studies on Nile phytoplankton in Egypt. II. Phytoplankton. - Int. Revue. Ges. Hydrobiol. 71 : 233

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References Akawy , A. 1993 : Structural studies on the area north of Qusier, Red Sea, Egypt . — Unpubl . M.Sc. thesis NW-SE Assiut University, (Egypt) . 206 p

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Egyptianism

Appropriating ‘Egypt’ in the ‘Isiac Cults’ of the Graeco-Roman World

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors: Valentino Gasparini and Richard L. Gordon

Summary

When dealing with Isis, Serapis and the other members of the so-called ‘gens isiaca’, scholars have hesitated whether to emphasize their (indisputable) historico-geographic origin in the Nile valley or their (no less indisputable) character as Graeco-Roman cults. We thus find these deities referred to as ‘Egyptian’, ‘Graeco-Egyptian’, ‘Graeco-Roman’, ‘Greek’, ‘Roman’ and, again, ‘Oriental’, ‘Orientalized Roman’, and so on. Each of these definitions is evidently partial, which is one reason for the growing preference for the less specific terms ‘Isiac gods’ and ‘Isiac cults’. Yet even these elide the problem of how these cults were perceived in relation to Egypt. This article aims to challenge the terms of the conventional dichotomy between Egyptian and Graeco-Roman, by exploring the many specific contexts in which ‘Egypt’ was appropriated, for example, by institutions, intellectuals (e.g. ‘Middle-’ and Neo-Platonists), Christian apologists, late-antique encyclopedists, etc. Starting with the comparandum ‘Persianism’ recently highlighted in relation to the cult of Mithras, the paper will explore the various interests and aims involved in the construction of ideas of Egypt, which might even involve more than one ‘Egyptianism’ at the same time. Each of our nine suggested ‘Egyptianisms’ is the creation of numerous ‘producers’, who adapted what they knew of ‘Egypt’ (‘foreign’, ‘exotic’, ‘other’) to create their own religious offers. Our basic model is derived from the Erfurt project Lived Ancient Religions, which inverts the usual representation of ancient religion as collective (‘polis religion’, ‘civic religion’) in favour of a perspective that stresses individual agency, sense-making and appropriation within a range of broader constraints.

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In recent years, Aleuroclava psidii (Singh) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) has been extending its geographic range due to the international movement of plant material. In October 2013, it was discovered on Psidium sp. (Myrtaceae) in Egypt and represents the first record of this species in Egypt and the Western Palearctic region.

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