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Abd-Rabou , S . ( 1996 ): Egyptian Aleyrodidae . Acta Phytopathol. et Entomol. Hung ., 31 , 275 – 285 . Abd-Rabou , S . ( 1999 ): New records of whiteflies in Egypt . Egyptian J. Agricultural Research , 77 , 1143 – 1145 . Abd-Rabou , S

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AECT — Faulkner, R. O. (1973–1978): The Ancient Egyptian Coffin Texts . Vols I–III. Warminster, Aris-Phillips Ltd. Faulkner R. O

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A preliminary report of the international research project on a Greek papyrus fragment from Ptolemaic Egypt (first half or middle of the second century BC) P. Vindob. G60514-60518.

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Egyptianism

Appropriating ‘Egypt’ in the ‘Isiac Cults’ of the Graeco-Roman World*

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors:
Valentino Gasparini
and
Richard L. Gordon

Summary

When dealing with Isis, Serapis and the other members of the so-called ‘gens isiaca’, scholars have hesitated whether to emphasize their (indisputable) historico-geographic origin in the Nile valley or their (no less indisputable) character as Graeco-Roman cults. We thus find these deities referred to as ‘Egyptian’, ‘Graeco-Egyptian’, ‘Graeco-Roman’, ‘Greek’, ‘Roman’ and, again, ‘Oriental’, ‘Orientalized Roman’, and so on. Each of these definitions is evidently partial, which is one reason for the growing preference for the less specific terms ‘Isiac gods’ and ‘Isiac cults’. Yet even these elide the problem of how these cults were perceived in relation to Egypt. This article aims to challenge the terms of the conventional dichotomy between Egyptian and Graeco-Roman, by exploring the many specific contexts in which ‘Egypt’ was appropriated, for example, by institutions, intellectuals (e.g. ‘Middle-’ and Neo-Platonists), Christian apologists, late-antique encyclopedists, etc. Starting with the comparandum ‘Persianism’ recently highlighted in relation to the cult of Mithras, the paper will explore the various interests and aims involved in the construction of ideas of Egypt, which might even involve more than one ‘Egyptianism’ at the same time. Each of our nine suggested ‘Egyptianisms’ is the creation of numerous ‘producers’, who adapted what they knew of ‘Egypt’ (‘foreign’, ‘exotic’, ‘other’) to create their own religious offers. Our basic model is derived from the Erfurt project Lived Ancient Religions, which inverts the usual representation of ancient religion as collective (‘polis religion’, ‘civic religion’) in favour of a perspective that stresses individual agency, sense-making and appropriation within a range of broader constraints.

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that forms on the honeydew and ants which feed on the honeydew and protect the scale insects from their natural enemies. Egypt has a long tradition in coccidology. Newstead (1906–1913), Hall (1922–1927) Bodenheimer (1929–1937) and Ezzat (1958

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Species of the family Signiphoridae (Chalcidoidea) are primarily hyperparasitoids associated with scale insects, whiteflies and mealybugs through other Chalcidoidea; however, certain species are primary parasitoids of these hosts. Recent collections and a review of the literature indicate that the following five species of the family Signiphoridae are known to occur in Egypt: Chartocerus niger (Ashmead), Chartocerus subaeneus (Főrster), Signiphora fax Girault, Thysanus sp. and Signiphora flavella Girault, the latter newly recorded in Egypt and Palearctic region. A key to the Egyptian signiphorid species is included.

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East countries has been described in several studies [ 10–16 ]. In Egypt, few studies have tackled the viral etiology of ARIs in children [ 17–20 ]. Nevertheless, little information is known regarding the viral etiology of respiratory tract infections

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. Environmental correlates of species distribution in arid desert ecosystems of eastern Egypt. J. Arid Environ. 38: 297-313. Environmental correlates of species distribution in arid desert ecosystems of eastern Egypt

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New Afro-Asiatic parallels are suggested for Egyptian lexical roots continued from the previous communications.

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Abstract  

Galena is the principal ore mineral for lead industry and the production of lead and its alloys. The industrial processing of galena includes its oxidized roasting to lead oxide, followed by reduction smelting of lead oxide agglomerate with coke in the blast furnace to commercial lead. The present work reports a thermal analysis study of oxidized roasting of Egyptian galena using a derivatograph. The reaction products were identified microscopically and by using a Siemens Crystalloflex diffractometer. On roasting of galena (heating in the air flow), its oxidation to lead sulphate was shown by a wide and small exothermic DTA peak at 460C. The reaction between galena and lead sulphate, produced PbSO4PbO at 580C, is shown by a small exothermic peak. A large and sharp exothermic tripple maximum at 730, 740 and 765C was due to the intensive oxidation of galena, accompanied by an increase in mass (TG). This mass increase is attributed to the formation of different sulphates. The mass loss is observed at temperature higher than 900C due to the dissociation of the sulphates to lead oxide and evolution of sulphur dioxide. The standard free energy (ΔG) and equilibrium constant (K) of the reaction of oxidation of galena to lead oxide at 800C are –167.102 kcal mol–1 and 1.091034, respectively. These values reflect the irreversibility of the reaction. The products of the oxidized roasting of galena are different, depending upon the temperature of roasting such as anglesite at 300C, basic lead sulphates of specified compositions: (PbSO4PbO at 600C, PbSO42PbO at 800C and PbSO44PbO at 900C) and lead oxide at 1000C.

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