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JPC - Journal of Planar Chromatography - Modern TLC
Authors: Nicoleta Hădărugă, Alina Branic, Daniel Hădărugă, Alexandra Gruia, Carmen Pleşa, Corina Costescu, Aurel Ardelean and Alfa Lupea

We report a comparative study of Juniperus virginiana and Juniperus communis essential oils (obtained by hydrodistillation of plant parts from the west of Romania or obtained commercially in Europe) by thin layer chromatographic and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. Concentrations of cineole and guaiazulene, key compounds with insect repellent and anti-inflammatory activity, were evaluated. Monoterpenes were more abundant in essential oils from berries (40.2% in J. virginiana essential oil and 34.4% in J. communis essential oil), followed by sesquiterpene alcohols, but the latter were more abundant in essential oils from leaves (26.9% in J. virginiana and 16.9% in J. communis). We also discovered substantial amounts of monoterpene alcohols (8.9–9.5% and 6.4–11.6% for J. virginiana and J. communis, respectively) and sesquiterpenes (more abundant in J. communis essential oils: 21.1% in berries and 12.4% in leaves; in J. virginiana essential oils amounts of sesquiterpenes were only 5.9–6.8%). The key compounds cineole and guaiazulene were present at low absolute concentrations. The first was more abundant in J. communis essential oils (2.6–3.5 μg mL−1); guaiazulene was identified in J. virginiana essential oil only (0.7 μg mL−1 in essential oil from the leaves). Thinlayer chromatographic analysis of Juniperus essential oils revealed the importance of the monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their corresponding alcohols in these mixtures. Cineole and guaiazulene spots from essential oils from autochthonous J. virginiana berries and leaves were very small, and were obscured by more abundant mono and sesquiterpenes (for example limonene) in the upper half of the chromatogram or mono and sesquiterpene alcohols (for example terpinen-4-ol) in the lower half of chromatograms. Similar results were also obtained for J. communis essential oils.

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JPC - Journal of Planar Chromatography - Modern TLC
Authors: Mieczysław Sajewicz, Łukasz Wojtal, Michał Hajnos, Monika Waksmundzka-Hajnos and Teresa Kowalska

In a previous paper we discussed the possibility of fractionating the essential oils of different sage species by low-temperature preparative layer chromatography (PLC), followed by preparative isolation of the contents of each fraction and further analysis by GC-MS. In that way we attempted to emphasize the practical usefulness of lowtemperature planar chromatography for investigation of volatile compounds. In this study, we explore a possibility of fractionating essential oils contained in the different sage species by low-temperature analytical TLC followed by direct mass spectrometric analysis of the separated fractions. This objective can be achieved by TLC-MS with on-line transfer of the eluted fractions. The densitograms obtained from five different sage species (i.e., S. lavandulifolia, S. staminea, S. hians, S. triloba , and S. nemorosa ) are compared. Each densitogram is accompanied by mass spectra recorded for each peak. Videoscans of the chromatograms are also presented. In this way multiple fingerprints of the analyzed plant material, each comprising a densitogram and a selection of mass spectra, were obtained. Advanced chemometric treatment of these multiple fingerprints can be used to reveal statistically significant differences between the plant species. Analytical and chemotaxonomic advantages and further aspects for this kind of approach are discussed.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Erika-Beáta Kerekes, Anita Vidács, Julianna Jenei Török, Csilla Gömöri, Tamás Petkovits, Muthusamy Chandrasekaran, Shine Kadaikunnan, Naiyf S. Alharbi, Csaba Vágvölgyi and Judit Krisch

References 1. Bakkali , F. , Averbeck , S. , Averbeck , D. , Idaomar , M. ( 2008 ) Biological effects of essential oils –a review . Food Chem. Toxicol. 46

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1218 2684 2691 K.H.C. Baser, G. Buchbauer (eds.), Handbook of Essential Oils: Science, Technology, and Applications, CRC Press, Boca

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citrus essential oils and their components: Detection using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. J. agric. Fd Chem. , 48 , 4156–4161. Sawamura M. Radical scavenging activities of

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, Lavandula dentata , and most of all Lavandula angustifolia. Narrow-leaved lavender ( L. angustifolia Mill. syn. Lavandula officinalis Chaix) is used in many industries mainly due to its essential oils characterized by a specific aroma. The oils

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. Kalemba A. Kunicka 2003 Antibacterial and antifungal properties of essential oils Curr Med Chem 10 813

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Angelini, L.C., Carpanese, G., Cioni, P.L., Morelli, L., Macchia, M. & Flamini, G. (2003): Essential oils from Mediterranean Lamiaceae as weed germination inhibitors. J. Agric. Fd Chem. , 51

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Dobetsberger C, Buchbauer G: Actions of essential oils on the central nervous system: An updated review. Flavour Fragr. J. 26, 300–316 (2011) Buchbauer G. Actions of essential oils on the central nervous system: An updated review

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Buchbauer, G. (2000): The detailed analysis of essential oils leads to the understanding of their properties. Perfum. Flavor. 25, 64–67. Buchbauer G. The detailed analysis of essential

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