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Abstract  

Lauroyl peroxide (LPO) is a typical organic peroxide that has caused many thermal runaway reactions and explosions. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was employed to determine the fundamental thermokinetic parameters that involved exothermic onset temperature (T0), heat of decomposition (ΔHd), and other safety parameters for loss prevention of runaway reactions and thermal explosions. Frequency factor (A) and activation energy (Ea) were calculated by Kissinger model, Ozawa equation, and thermal safety software (TSS) series via DSC experimental data. Liquid thermal explosion (LTE) by TSS was employed to simulate the thermal explosion development for various types of storage tank. In view of loss prevention, calorimetric application and model analysis to integrate thermal hazard development were necessary and useful for inherently safer design.

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, calorimetry technology was used to observe the exothermic behaviors by DSC, such as exothermic onset temperature ( T 0 ), peak temperature ( T p ), and heat of decomposition (Δ H d ), and then TAM III was used to obtain the thermokinetic parameters, such as

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temperature ( T 0 ), heat of decomposition (Δ H d ), maximum temperature ( T max ), maximum pressure ( P max ), self-heating rate (d T d t −1 ), pressure rise rate (d P d t −1 ), etc., by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and vent sizing package

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), • Adiabatic kinetics parameters, • Rates of temperature and pressure rise (d T d t −1 and d P d t −1 ), • Exothermic onset temperature ( T 0

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parameters of OPs have been proposed by a couple of excellent studies over the latest years [ 8 – 12 ]. This study was used to survey the fundamental thermal hazard of TBPO. The exothermic onset temperature ( T 0 ), heat of decomposition (Δ H d ), activation

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calorimetry (DSC), exothermic onset temperatures ( T 0 ) of 80 mass% CHP was previously discovered to be around 110 °C [ 7 ]. Thermal runaway reaction and explosion accidents have been studied and analyzed in recent years [ 8 ]. In fact, heat generation rate

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evaluated according to the application of the scanning rate of 4 °C min −1 , as illustrated in Fig. 1 . DSC detected thermal curves of decomposition of the anode and cathode, such as exothermic onset temperature ( T 0 ), the maximum exothermic temperature

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors:
Sheng-Hung Wu
,
Hung-Cheng Chou
,
Ryh-Nan Pan
,
Yi-Hao Huang
,
Jao-Jia Horng
,
Jen-Hao Chi
, and
Chi-Min Shu

temperature ( T 0 ) as about 70 °C of 31 mass% MEKPO mixed with acid and base. Results indicated that mixing MEKPO with base and acid was prohibited [ 16 ]. Chang et al. describe the degree of hazard as follows: T 0 of MEKPO

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Abstract  

Organic peroxides (OPs) have caused many momentous explosions and runaway reactions, resulting from thermal instability, chemical pollutants, and even mechanical shock. In Taiwan, dicumyl peroxide (DCPO), due to its unstable reactive nature, has caused two thermal explosions and runaway reaction incidents in the manufacturing process. To evaluate thermal hazards of DCPO in a batch reactor, we studied thermokinetic parameters, such as heat of decomposition (†H d), exothermic onset temperature (T 0), maximum temperature rise ((dT/dt)max), maximum pressure rise ((dP/dt)max), self-heating rate (dT/dt), etc., via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and vent sizing package 2 (VSP2).

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Abstract  

Organic peroxides (OPs) are very susceptible to thermal sources, chemical pollutants or even mechanical shock. Over the years, they have caused many serious explosions. Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) is widely employed to produce phenol and dicumyl peroxide (DCPO) in the manufacturing process. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal activity monitor (TAM) were employed to determine the potential thermal hazards and thermokinetic parameters (such as exothermic onset temperature (T 0), maximum temperature (T max), and enthalpy (ΔH)) of CHP mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyze the concentration vs. time of CHP.When CHP is mixed with NaOH, the T 0 is induced earlier and reactions become more intricate than the pure CHP solution. CHP added to NaOH or H2SO4 is more dangerous than pure CHP alone. Depending on the operating conditions, NaOH and H2SO4 are the incompatible chemicals for CHP.

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