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György Kurtág selected fragments from Franz Kafka's Tagebücher, Octavhefte, Kafka's letters and other writings for his Kafka-Fragmente, op. 24. The 40 fragments in György Kurtág's, op. 24 use 38 texts. 12 are taken from the Tagebücher, 12 from the Octavhefte, 11 from other fragments and aphorisms, and 1 each from Kafka's letters to Oskar Pollock, Felice Bauer, and Milena Jesenská. The texts contain 1103 syllables, unequally distributed. The fragments selected by Kurtág cover a broad range of rhythmic situations, some of wich echo one another across the work. One of the major variables is the extent to which, in a given fragment, the sequence of accents approaches the predictability of conventional verse meters. A second major variable is the extent to which the singer's rhythmic figures are announced, supported, or echoed by the violin. A third is the presence, or absence of brief melismas or extended vocalises. A forth is the correlation, or lack of correlation between shifts in text rhythm and shifts from one group of tones to another.

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.-G. Ludwig Wittgenstein 1969 Gray, Ronald (1973) Franz Kafka . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

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Kafka. His thematic and sound research together with his impressionistic approach to Kafkaesque subjects were guided by Marthe Robert’s important psychological–literary analysis included in her book Seul, comme Franz Kafka (1979). 46 The three studies

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) occurs in measures 39–44 and Scale a) in a typical form in measures 57–58, while Scale c) plays an important role in measures 145–148, for example. Max Brod, a Prague writer and composer of German Jewish stock and guardian of Franz Kafka’s

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