Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 248 items for :

  • "Gamma radiation" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

health and safety. Any process should be safe for the operator and the environment and no chemical residues should remain in the treated materials. In this context, some researchers [ 5 – 9 ] have suggested the use of gamma radiation as an alternative for

Restricted access

Abstract  

Alachlor has been widely used in agriculture all over the world. It is suggested that it may be a carcinogen and an environmental estrogen. The aim of this work was to verify the degradation the alachlor by gamma radiation. Gamma radiation from 60Co was used to degrade the alachlor herbicide in water and methanol solution. The alachlor in water and alcohol solution in the concentration of 100 mgL−1 was irradiated with doses of 0.25–50 kGy, at dose rate 5–6 and 2.7 kGyh−1. High performance liquid chromatography was used as an analytical technique to determine the degradation rate of herbicide studied.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Samples of pure polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and PVA doped with humic acids were exposed to gamma radiation. Gamma rays induced the degradation of the pure polymer. Degradation changes were observed using ATR FT-IR equipment. Dehydration, double bond creation, and their subsequent oxidation (surrounding atmosphere was air) were found out. Also, other degradation reactions (e.g. chain scission, cyclization) occur simultaneously. Formation of C=C and C=O bonds is apparent from FT-IR spectra. In contrast the presence of humic acids in the PVA sample showed stabilizing effect on PVA structure within the concentration range 0.5–10%.

Restricted access
Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Mayté Paredes Zaldivar, Norma Galego Fernández, Cristina Gastón Peña, Manuel Rapado Paneque, and Sonia Altanés Valentín

aim of this study was the synthesis and characterization of a new semi-interpenetrating polymer network hydrogel of PAA and PHB using gamma radiations. Materials and methods Materials Polyhydroxybutyrate

Restricted access

Abstract  

The effect of gamma-radiations on bilirubin, in vitro, has been studied. It was found that gamma-radiation causes oxidation of bilirubin to biliverdine as one of the products. The likely implication of this effect in transformation of bilirubin to excretable products, in vivo, in case of jaundice is discussed.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Yeast is an important component in microbe based industrial technologies. Due to the techno-economic reasons, the fermentation technique has acquired renewed interest. The effect of -radiation on the fermentation reaction has been investigated. The studies show that exposure of the fermentation mixture to -radiation at 5 kGy enhance alcohol production, whereas irradiation at higher doses, viz., 10 kGy and 25 kGy caused a considerable reduction in the alcohol yield. Therefore, low dose irradiation of fermentation mixtures can be applied for increasing the alcohol production by about 25%.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 °C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm−3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h−1, with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Aqueous solution of rose bengal dye has been studied spectrophotometrically as a gamma-ray dosimeter for the measurement of low doses of radiation. The useful dose range was found to be from 50 to 1000 Gy when the measurements were made at 549 nm. The effects of temperature and light conditions on the stability of response during post-irradiation storage were also investigated. When stored in dark at room temperature, the dosimetric solutions showed a stable response up to 22 days. The storage of irradiated solutions in diffused sunlight showed a stable response only up to 6 days. When exposed to direct sunlight, very prominent and fast bleaching of dye solution occurred. At low storage temperature (ca. 11 °C), dosimetric response was found to be stable up to 22 days while at higher temperature (ca. 30 °C), the response of dosimetric solution was stable only up to 6 days. The rose bengal aqueous solution showed promising characteristics as a low dose radiation dosimeter when stored at lower temperatures (<25 °C) in dark.

Restricted access

Abstract  

A composite scintillation detector consisting of two scintillators with different scintillation decay times, exhibiting a very low sensitivity to isotropic -radiation is presented in the paper. Detection characteristics of several such detectors have been experimentally verified and the rules for their design are given.

Restricted access

Summary  

Crotoxin is a 23 kDa neurotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus and is composed of a 9 kDa acidic subunit (crotapotin) and a 14 kDa basic subunit (phospholipase A2). Crotamine is 4882 Da, basic polypeptide with myotoxic activity. These toxins, when submitted to gamma-rays, in aqueous solution, present structural modifications, preserving their immunogenic properties. In the present work, we investigated some structural modifications on both crotoxin and crotamine after gamma-radiation using various doses, in the presence or not of “scavenger” substances. Our results indicate that irradiation leads to progressive changes in the structure of the toxin, which could explain the lower toxicity observed.

Restricted access